High-resolution electrohydrodynamic jet printing

Jang Ung Park, Matt Hardy, Seong Jun Kang, Kira Barton, Kurt Adair, Deep Kishore Mukhopadhyay, Chang Young Lee, Michael S. Strano, Andrew G. Alleyne, John G. Georgiadis, Placid M. Ferreira, John A. Rogers

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

839 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Efforts to adapt and extend graphic arts printing techniques for demanding device applications in electronics, biotechnology and microelectromechanical systems have grown rapidly in recent years. Here, we describe the use of electrohydrodynamically induced fluid flows through fine microcapillary nozzles for jet printing of patterns and functional devices with submicrometre resolution. Key aspects of the physics of this approach, which has some features in common with related but comparatively low-resolution techniques for graphic arts, are revealed through direct high-speed imaging of the droplet formation processes. Printing of complex patterns of inks, ranging from insulating and conducting polymers, to solution suspensions of silicon nanoparticles and rods, to single-walled carbon nanotubes, using integrated computer-controlled printer systems illustrates some of the capabilities. High-resolution printed metal interconnects, electrodes and probing pads for representative circuit patterns and functional transistors with critical dimensions as small as 1m demonstrate potential applications in printed electronics.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)782-789
Number of pages8
JournalNature materials
Volume6
Issue number10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2007 Oct

Fingerprint

Electrohydrodynamics
electrohydrodynamics
graphic arts
printing
Printing
high resolution
Electronic equipment
Printers (computer)
biotechnology
printers
Conducting polymers
conducting polymers
inks
Silicon
Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCN)
Biotechnology
electronics
Ink
nozzles
fluid flow

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Chemistry(all)
  • Materials Science(all)
  • Condensed Matter Physics
  • Mechanics of Materials
  • Mechanical Engineering

Cite this

Park, J. U., Hardy, M., Kang, S. J., Barton, K., Adair, K., Mukhopadhyay, D. K., ... Rogers, J. A. (2007). High-resolution electrohydrodynamic jet printing. Nature materials, 6(10), 782-789. https://doi.org/10.1038/nmat1974
Park, Jang Ung ; Hardy, Matt ; Kang, Seong Jun ; Barton, Kira ; Adair, Kurt ; Mukhopadhyay, Deep Kishore ; Lee, Chang Young ; Strano, Michael S. ; Alleyne, Andrew G. ; Georgiadis, John G. ; Ferreira, Placid M. ; Rogers, John A. / High-resolution electrohydrodynamic jet printing. In: Nature materials. 2007 ; Vol. 6, No. 10. pp. 782-789.
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Park, JU, Hardy, M, Kang, SJ, Barton, K, Adair, K, Mukhopadhyay, DK, Lee, CY, Strano, MS, Alleyne, AG, Georgiadis, JG, Ferreira, PM & Rogers, JA 2007, 'High-resolution electrohydrodynamic jet printing', Nature materials, vol. 6, no. 10, pp. 782-789. https://doi.org/10.1038/nmat1974

High-resolution electrohydrodynamic jet printing. / Park, Jang Ung; Hardy, Matt; Kang, Seong Jun; Barton, Kira; Adair, Kurt; Mukhopadhyay, Deep Kishore; Lee, Chang Young; Strano, Michael S.; Alleyne, Andrew G.; Georgiadis, John G.; Ferreira, Placid M.; Rogers, John A.

In: Nature materials, Vol. 6, No. 10, 10.2007, p. 782-789.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Park JU, Hardy M, Kang SJ, Barton K, Adair K, Mukhopadhyay DK et al. High-resolution electrohydrodynamic jet printing. Nature materials. 2007 Oct;6(10):782-789. https://doi.org/10.1038/nmat1974