High School Dropouts in Emerging Adulthood: Substance Use, Mental Health Problems, and Crime

Brandy R. Maynard, Christopher P. Salas-Wright, Michael George Vaughn

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

30 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study examined the distribution of substance use, mental health, and criminal behavior among dropouts derived from a nationally representative sample of 18–25 year old (N = 19,312) emerging adults in the United States. Using public-use data from the 2010 National Survey on Drug Use and Health, this study employed multiple logistic regression with adjustments for complex survey sampling and compared high school dropouts with graduates with respect to substance use, mental health, and criminal behavior. After controlling for the effects of age, gender, race/ethnicity, family income, receipt of government assistance, employment status, and metropolitan population density, dropouts were more likely to meet criteria for nicotine dependence and report daily cigarette use, and more likely to report having attempted suicide in the previous year, been arrested for larceny, assault, drug possession or drug sales relative to their high school graduate counterparts. The findings of this study provide important insights and an initial epidemiologic portrait of mental health, substance use, and criminal behaviors of dropouts during emerging adulthood.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)289-299
Number of pages11
JournalCommunity Mental Health Journal
Volume51
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015 Jan 1

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Student Dropouts
Crime
drop-out
adulthood
criminality
Mental Health
mental health
offense
health behavior
Pharmaceutical Preparations
school
Attempted Suicide
Tobacco Use Disorder
metropolitan population
Population Density
drug
Tobacco Products
larceny
school graduate
family income

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Health(social science)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

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High School Dropouts in Emerging Adulthood : Substance Use, Mental Health Problems, and Crime. / Maynard, Brandy R.; Salas-Wright, Christopher P.; Vaughn, Michael George.

In: Community Mental Health Journal, Vol. 51, No. 3, 01.01.2015, p. 289-299.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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