High-throughput optical injection of mammalian cells using a non-diffracting beam in a microfluidic platform

Helen A. Rendall, Robert F. Marchington, Bavishna B. Praveen, Gerald Bergmann, Yoshihiko Arita, Alexander Heisterkamp, Frank J. Gunn-Moore, Kishan Dholakia

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Femtosecond photoporation is an optical, non-invasive method of injecting membrane impermeable substances contained within the surrounding medium into cells. The technique typically addresses individual cells in a static monolayer. While this gives excellent selectivity, it can be time consuming or impractical to treat larger samples. We build on previous work using a microfluidic platform, which allows for a suspension of cells to be dosed with femtosecond light as they flow through a microfluidic channel. A reusuable quartz chip is designed with an 's'-bend with facilitates the delivery of a 'non-diffracting' femtosecond Bessel beam along the centre of the channel. By implementing off-chip hydrodynamic focusing, cells are confined to the central region of the channel and pass along the Bessel beam core where they are photoporated. This new parallel approach allows for higher flow rates to be used compared to the previous, orthogonal, design whilst maintaining the necessary dwell time in the Bessel beam core. Optical injection of the cell membrane impermeable stain propidium iodide has been successful with two cell lines. These have yielded viable injection efficiencies of 31.0±9.5% Chinese hamster ovary cells (CHO-K1) and 20.4±4.2% human promyelocytic cells (HL60) with a cell throughput of up to 10 cells/second. This marks an order of magnitude increase compared to the previous microfluidic design.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationFrontiers in Ultrafast Optics
Subtitle of host publicationBiomedical, Scientific, and Industrial Applications XIII
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013 May 29
EventFrontiers in Ultrafast Optics: Biomedical, Scientific, and Industrial Applications XIII - San Francisco, CA, United States
Duration: 2013 Feb 32013 Feb 5

Publication series

NameProceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering
Volume8611
ISSN (Print)0277-786X

Conference

ConferenceFrontiers in Ultrafast Optics: Biomedical, Scientific, and Industrial Applications XIII
CountryUnited States
CitySan Francisco, CA
Period13/2/313/2/5

Fingerprint

Optical Injection
Microfluidics
High Throughput
platforms
Cells
Throughput
injection
Cell
cells
Bessel Beam
Quartz
Propidium
Femtosecond
Cell membranes
Monolayers
Suspensions
Coloring Agents
Hydrodynamics
Flow rate
Membranes

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Electronic, Optical and Magnetic Materials
  • Condensed Matter Physics
  • Computer Science Applications
  • Applied Mathematics
  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering

Cite this

Rendall, H. A., Marchington, R. F., Praveen, B. B., Bergmann, G., Arita, Y., Heisterkamp, A., ... Dholakia, K. (2013). High-throughput optical injection of mammalian cells using a non-diffracting beam in a microfluidic platform. In Frontiers in Ultrafast Optics: Biomedical, Scientific, and Industrial Applications XIII [861103] (Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering; Vol. 8611). https://doi.org/10.1117/12.2003193
Rendall, Helen A. ; Marchington, Robert F. ; Praveen, Bavishna B. ; Bergmann, Gerald ; Arita, Yoshihiko ; Heisterkamp, Alexander ; Gunn-Moore, Frank J. ; Dholakia, Kishan. / High-throughput optical injection of mammalian cells using a non-diffracting beam in a microfluidic platform. Frontiers in Ultrafast Optics: Biomedical, Scientific, and Industrial Applications XIII. 2013. (Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering).
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Rendall, HA, Marchington, RF, Praveen, BB, Bergmann, G, Arita, Y, Heisterkamp, A, Gunn-Moore, FJ & Dholakia, K 2013, High-throughput optical injection of mammalian cells using a non-diffracting beam in a microfluidic platform. in Frontiers in Ultrafast Optics: Biomedical, Scientific, and Industrial Applications XIII., 861103, Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering, vol. 8611, Frontiers in Ultrafast Optics: Biomedical, Scientific, and Industrial Applications XIII, San Francisco, CA, United States, 13/2/3. https://doi.org/10.1117/12.2003193

High-throughput optical injection of mammalian cells using a non-diffracting beam in a microfluidic platform. / Rendall, Helen A.; Marchington, Robert F.; Praveen, Bavishna B.; Bergmann, Gerald; Arita, Yoshihiko; Heisterkamp, Alexander; Gunn-Moore, Frank J.; Dholakia, Kishan.

Frontiers in Ultrafast Optics: Biomedical, Scientific, and Industrial Applications XIII. 2013. 861103 (Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering; Vol. 8611).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

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Rendall HA, Marchington RF, Praveen BB, Bergmann G, Arita Y, Heisterkamp A et al. High-throughput optical injection of mammalian cells using a non-diffracting beam in a microfluidic platform. In Frontiers in Ultrafast Optics: Biomedical, Scientific, and Industrial Applications XIII. 2013. 861103. (Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering). https://doi.org/10.1117/12.2003193