Higher intraocular pressure is associated with leukoaraiosis among middle-aged and elderly Koreans without glaucoma or dementia

B. J. Park, J. K. Kim, Y. J. Lee

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

AimLeukoaraiosis and high intraocular pressure are strongly associated with cardiovascular disease, vascular angiopathy, and geriatric syndrome. Until now, little is known about the relationship between intraocular pressure and leukoaraiosis in its preclinical stage. The aim of this study was to evaluate the association between intraocular pressure and leukoaraiosis among middle-aged and elderly Koreans without glaucoma or dementia.MethodsWe examined the relationship of intraocular pressure with leukoaraiosis at a preclinical stage in 753 Korean adults (474 men, 279 women; mean age 57.8±6.6 years). A multiple logistic regression analysis was performed in order to determine whether intraocular pressure is an independent determinant for leukoaraiosis.ResultsThe overall prevalence of leukoaraiosis was 7.3%. Mean ocular pressure (±SD) was significantly higher in the leukoaraiosis group than the control group (14.3±2.9 and 13.5±2.9, respectively; P=0.028). In multiple logistic regression analysis, the odds ratio for leukoaraiosis was 1.18 (95% confidence interval: 1.06-1.31) for each 1 mm Hg increase in intraocular pressure.ConclusionIntraocular pressure was found to be independently and positively associated with leukoaraiosis. This finding indicates that higher intraocular pressure may be a useful additional measure in assessing the risk of leukoaraiosis in the clinical setting.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)715-719
Number of pages5
JournalEye (Basingstoke)
Volume28
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014 Jun

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Ophthalmology
  • Sensory Systems

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