Household income changes and suicidal ideation in South Korea: Findings from a longitudinal study

Doo Woong Lee, Hin Moi Youn, Soo Hyun Kang, Sung In Jang, Eun Cheol Park

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Introduction: This study aimed to provide evidence for the need for social and welfare support in suicide prevention. Methods: Data were collected from the Korean Welfare Panel Study, 2011–2016. The study sample consisted of 7504 people (male: 3080 and female: 4424; mean age: 54.4 ± 16.6), with annual follow-ups until 2016. A generalized linear mixed-effects model using a logit link function with random intercept for longitudinal binary data was employed to identify the association between household income change and suicidal ideation status. Results: Suicidal ideation was found in 279 (3.7%) people at the baseline year. A drastic reduction in household income was associated with an increased probability of having suicidal ideation (adjusted odds ratio: 2.205, 95% confidence interval: 1.326–3.666). Using interaction analyses, those who had a drastic reduction in household income and were married, males, aged 40–49, and previously in a middle- to high-income group showed a higher probability of having suicidal ideation. Conclusion: A drastic reduction in household income was associated with a higher probability of suicidal ideation, with specific differences according to gender, age, previous household income level, and marital status. This study reinforces the need for social and welfare support in suicide prevention policies and programs.

Original languageEnglish
JournalSuicide and Life-Threatening Behavior
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 2021

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2021 The American Association of Suicidology

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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