How feeling free to talk affects ordinary political conversation, purposeful argumentation, and civic participation

Robert O. Wyatt, Joohan Kim, Elihu Katz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

35 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Scholars have examined how specific opinion climates affect political discourse, but little attention has been given to how perceived freedom to talk in general is related to congenial political conversation in ordinary spaces or willingness to argue with an opponent - or how each mode of talk affects civic participation. Respondents in a nationwide survey felt free to talk about politics. Freedom to talk, issue-specific news, and newspaper use were most strongly related to ordinary political conversation. With argumentation, issue-specific news, issue-specific talk, and local opinion climate dominated. Ordinary political conversation was significantly related to conventional participation; argumentation was not.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)99-114
Number of pages16
JournalJournalism and Mass Communication Quaterly
Volume77
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2000 Jan 1

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argumentation
conversation
participation
news
climate
newspaper
politics
discourse

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Communication

Cite this

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How feeling free to talk affects ordinary political conversation, purposeful argumentation, and civic participation. / Wyatt, Robert O.; Kim, Joohan; Katz, Elihu.

In: Journalism and Mass Communication Quaterly, Vol. 77, No. 1, 01.01.2000, p. 99-114.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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