IBCOM (Intra-Brain Communication) microsystem: Wireless transmission of neural signals within the brain

Khaled M. Al-Ashmouny, Chris Boldt, John E. Ferguson, Arthur G. Erdman, A. David Redish, Euisik Yoon

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We report our preliminary work to explore a new method of signal transmission for bio-implantable microsystems. Intra-brain communication or IBCOM is a wireless signal transmission method that uses the brain itself as a conductive medium to transmit the data and commands between neural implants and data processing systems outside the brain. Two miniaturized IBCOM (μ-IBCOM) CMOS chips were designed and fabricated for an in vivo test bed to transmit two prerecorded neural signals at different binary frequency shift keying (BFSK) carrier frequencies to validate the feasibility of IBCOM concept. The chips were packaged for full implantation in a rat brain except for external power delivery. The original neural signal waveforms were successfully recovered after being transmitted between two platinum electrodes separated by 15 mm with transmission power less than 650 pJ/bit for the CMOS implementation.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of the 31st Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society
Subtitle of host publicationEngineering the Future of Biomedicine, EMBC 2009
PublisherIEEE Computer Society
Pages2054-2057
Number of pages4
ISBN (Print)9781424432967
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2009 Jan 1
Event31st Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society: Engineering the Future of Biomedicine, EMBC 2009 - Minneapolis, MN, United States
Duration: 2009 Sep 22009 Sep 6

Publication series

NameProceedings of the 31st Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society: Engineering the Future of Biomedicine, EMBC 2009

Conference

Conference31st Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society: Engineering the Future of Biomedicine, EMBC 2009
CountryUnited States
CityMinneapolis, MN
Period09/9/209/9/6

Fingerprint

Microsystems
Synaptic Transmission
Brain
Communication
Frequency shift keying
Platinum
Power transmission
Information Systems
Rats
Electrodes

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Cell Biology
  • Developmental Biology
  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Al-Ashmouny, K. M., Boldt, C., Ferguson, J. E., Erdman, A. G., Redish, A. D., & Yoon, E. (2009). IBCOM (Intra-Brain Communication) microsystem: Wireless transmission of neural signals within the brain. In Proceedings of the 31st Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society: Engineering the Future of Biomedicine, EMBC 2009 (pp. 2054-2057). [5334432] (Proceedings of the 31st Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society: Engineering the Future of Biomedicine, EMBC 2009). IEEE Computer Society. https://doi.org/10.1109/IEMBS.2009.5334432
Al-Ashmouny, Khaled M. ; Boldt, Chris ; Ferguson, John E. ; Erdman, Arthur G. ; Redish, A. David ; Yoon, Euisik. / IBCOM (Intra-Brain Communication) microsystem : Wireless transmission of neural signals within the brain. Proceedings of the 31st Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society: Engineering the Future of Biomedicine, EMBC 2009. IEEE Computer Society, 2009. pp. 2054-2057 (Proceedings of the 31st Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society: Engineering the Future of Biomedicine, EMBC 2009).
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Al-Ashmouny, KM, Boldt, C, Ferguson, JE, Erdman, AG, Redish, AD & Yoon, E 2009, IBCOM (Intra-Brain Communication) microsystem: Wireless transmission of neural signals within the brain. in Proceedings of the 31st Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society: Engineering the Future of Biomedicine, EMBC 2009., 5334432, Proceedings of the 31st Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society: Engineering the Future of Biomedicine, EMBC 2009, IEEE Computer Society, pp. 2054-2057, 31st Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society: Engineering the Future of Biomedicine, EMBC 2009, Minneapolis, MN, United States, 09/9/2. https://doi.org/10.1109/IEMBS.2009.5334432

IBCOM (Intra-Brain Communication) microsystem : Wireless transmission of neural signals within the brain. / Al-Ashmouny, Khaled M.; Boldt, Chris; Ferguson, John E.; Erdman, Arthur G.; Redish, A. David; Yoon, Euisik.

Proceedings of the 31st Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society: Engineering the Future of Biomedicine, EMBC 2009. IEEE Computer Society, 2009. p. 2054-2057 5334432 (Proceedings of the 31st Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society: Engineering the Future of Biomedicine, EMBC 2009).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

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Al-Ashmouny KM, Boldt C, Ferguson JE, Erdman AG, Redish AD, Yoon E. IBCOM (Intra-Brain Communication) microsystem: Wireless transmission of neural signals within the brain. In Proceedings of the 31st Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society: Engineering the Future of Biomedicine, EMBC 2009. IEEE Computer Society. 2009. p. 2054-2057. 5334432. (Proceedings of the 31st Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society: Engineering the Future of Biomedicine, EMBC 2009). https://doi.org/10.1109/IEMBS.2009.5334432