IgE immune response to Ginko biloba pollen

Y. Y. Yun, S. H. Ko, Jungwon Park, C. S. Hong

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: The ginkgo (Ginkgo biloba L.) continues to be planted as a shade tree in preference to other species in Seoul, Korea. The proportion of ginkgo to total shade trees was 43.2% in 1998, but the allergenic characteristics of ginkgo pollen has not been elucidated. Objectives: This study was undertaken to obtain information regarding the skin reactivity rate to ginkgo pollen in a population of Korean subjects with respiratory allergy. Possible ginkgo pollen allergens and the cross-reactivity of ginkgo pollen with other prevalent pollens were also examined. Methods: Four hundred and forty-seven patients with asthma and/or allergic rhinitis were skin prick tested with extract of ginkgo pollen (1:20 wt/vol). Of these patients, positive skin responders (A/H ratio ≥2+) were selected for ELISA and immunoblot experiments. Results: A total of 21 patients (4.7%) showed skin reactivity (A/H ratio ≥2+) to ginkgo pollen in the skin prick test. They were also cosensitized to many other tree, grass, and weed pollens. Sixteen (76%) of the 21 positive skin responders showed specific IgE responses to ginkgo pollen in ELISA. In inhibitory ELISA, IgE binding to ginkgo pollen was inhibited by more than 80% by oak, ryegrass, mugwort, and ragweed; and 34% by hop Japanese; and 10% by rBet v 2 at 10 μg/mL. In immunoblot, 10 out of 21 sera (48%) reacted to the 15-kD protein of ginkgo pollen, 9 (43%) to 33-35 kD, and 8 (38%) to 36-38 kD. In inhibitory immunoblot, IgE binding to ginkgo pollen proteins was almost completely inhibited by oak, ryegrass, mugwort and ragweed, but only partially by hop Japanese and rBet v 2. Conclusion: The skin reactivity rate to ginkgo pollen is approximately 4.7% in a population of Korean subjects with respiratory allergy. Since ginkgo pollen has a high cross-reactivity with other prevalent pollens, it could cause clinical symptoms during its pollen season by cross-reacting with the IgE produced in response to other pollens in patients sensitized to multiple pollens.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)298-302
Number of pages5
JournalAnnals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology
Volume85
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2000 Jan 1

Fingerprint

Ginkgo biloba
Pollen
Immunoglobulin E
Skin
Ambrosia
Artemisia
Humulus
Lolium
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
Hypersensitivity

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Immunology
  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine

Cite this

Yun, Y. Y. ; Ko, S. H. ; Park, Jungwon ; Hong, C. S. / IgE immune response to Ginko biloba pollen. In: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology. 2000 ; Vol. 85, No. 4. pp. 298-302.
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title = "IgE immune response to Ginko biloba pollen",
abstract = "Background: The ginkgo (Ginkgo biloba L.) continues to be planted as a shade tree in preference to other species in Seoul, Korea. The proportion of ginkgo to total shade trees was 43.2{\%} in 1998, but the allergenic characteristics of ginkgo pollen has not been elucidated. Objectives: This study was undertaken to obtain information regarding the skin reactivity rate to ginkgo pollen in a population of Korean subjects with respiratory allergy. Possible ginkgo pollen allergens and the cross-reactivity of ginkgo pollen with other prevalent pollens were also examined. Methods: Four hundred and forty-seven patients with asthma and/or allergic rhinitis were skin prick tested with extract of ginkgo pollen (1:20 wt/vol). Of these patients, positive skin responders (A/H ratio ≥2+) were selected for ELISA and immunoblot experiments. Results: A total of 21 patients (4.7{\%}) showed skin reactivity (A/H ratio ≥2+) to ginkgo pollen in the skin prick test. They were also cosensitized to many other tree, grass, and weed pollens. Sixteen (76{\%}) of the 21 positive skin responders showed specific IgE responses to ginkgo pollen in ELISA. In inhibitory ELISA, IgE binding to ginkgo pollen was inhibited by more than 80{\%} by oak, ryegrass, mugwort, and ragweed; and 34{\%} by hop Japanese; and 10{\%} by rBet v 2 at 10 μg/mL. In immunoblot, 10 out of 21 sera (48{\%}) reacted to the 15-kD protein of ginkgo pollen, 9 (43{\%}) to 33-35 kD, and 8 (38{\%}) to 36-38 kD. In inhibitory immunoblot, IgE binding to ginkgo pollen proteins was almost completely inhibited by oak, ryegrass, mugwort and ragweed, but only partially by hop Japanese and rBet v 2. Conclusion: The skin reactivity rate to ginkgo pollen is approximately 4.7{\%} in a population of Korean subjects with respiratory allergy. Since ginkgo pollen has a high cross-reactivity with other prevalent pollens, it could cause clinical symptoms during its pollen season by cross-reacting with the IgE produced in response to other pollens in patients sensitized to multiple pollens.",
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IgE immune response to Ginko biloba pollen. / Yun, Y. Y.; Ko, S. H.; Park, Jungwon; Hong, C. S.

In: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology, Vol. 85, No. 4, 01.01.2000, p. 298-302.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - IgE immune response to Ginko biloba pollen

AU - Yun, Y. Y.

AU - Ko, S. H.

AU - Park, Jungwon

AU - Hong, C. S.

PY - 2000/1/1

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N2 - Background: The ginkgo (Ginkgo biloba L.) continues to be planted as a shade tree in preference to other species in Seoul, Korea. The proportion of ginkgo to total shade trees was 43.2% in 1998, but the allergenic characteristics of ginkgo pollen has not been elucidated. Objectives: This study was undertaken to obtain information regarding the skin reactivity rate to ginkgo pollen in a population of Korean subjects with respiratory allergy. Possible ginkgo pollen allergens and the cross-reactivity of ginkgo pollen with other prevalent pollens were also examined. Methods: Four hundred and forty-seven patients with asthma and/or allergic rhinitis were skin prick tested with extract of ginkgo pollen (1:20 wt/vol). Of these patients, positive skin responders (A/H ratio ≥2+) were selected for ELISA and immunoblot experiments. Results: A total of 21 patients (4.7%) showed skin reactivity (A/H ratio ≥2+) to ginkgo pollen in the skin prick test. They were also cosensitized to many other tree, grass, and weed pollens. Sixteen (76%) of the 21 positive skin responders showed specific IgE responses to ginkgo pollen in ELISA. In inhibitory ELISA, IgE binding to ginkgo pollen was inhibited by more than 80% by oak, ryegrass, mugwort, and ragweed; and 34% by hop Japanese; and 10% by rBet v 2 at 10 μg/mL. In immunoblot, 10 out of 21 sera (48%) reacted to the 15-kD protein of ginkgo pollen, 9 (43%) to 33-35 kD, and 8 (38%) to 36-38 kD. In inhibitory immunoblot, IgE binding to ginkgo pollen proteins was almost completely inhibited by oak, ryegrass, mugwort and ragweed, but only partially by hop Japanese and rBet v 2. Conclusion: The skin reactivity rate to ginkgo pollen is approximately 4.7% in a population of Korean subjects with respiratory allergy. Since ginkgo pollen has a high cross-reactivity with other prevalent pollens, it could cause clinical symptoms during its pollen season by cross-reacting with the IgE produced in response to other pollens in patients sensitized to multiple pollens.

AB - Background: The ginkgo (Ginkgo biloba L.) continues to be planted as a shade tree in preference to other species in Seoul, Korea. The proportion of ginkgo to total shade trees was 43.2% in 1998, but the allergenic characteristics of ginkgo pollen has not been elucidated. Objectives: This study was undertaken to obtain information regarding the skin reactivity rate to ginkgo pollen in a population of Korean subjects with respiratory allergy. Possible ginkgo pollen allergens and the cross-reactivity of ginkgo pollen with other prevalent pollens were also examined. Methods: Four hundred and forty-seven patients with asthma and/or allergic rhinitis were skin prick tested with extract of ginkgo pollen (1:20 wt/vol). Of these patients, positive skin responders (A/H ratio ≥2+) were selected for ELISA and immunoblot experiments. Results: A total of 21 patients (4.7%) showed skin reactivity (A/H ratio ≥2+) to ginkgo pollen in the skin prick test. They were also cosensitized to many other tree, grass, and weed pollens. Sixteen (76%) of the 21 positive skin responders showed specific IgE responses to ginkgo pollen in ELISA. In inhibitory ELISA, IgE binding to ginkgo pollen was inhibited by more than 80% by oak, ryegrass, mugwort, and ragweed; and 34% by hop Japanese; and 10% by rBet v 2 at 10 μg/mL. In immunoblot, 10 out of 21 sera (48%) reacted to the 15-kD protein of ginkgo pollen, 9 (43%) to 33-35 kD, and 8 (38%) to 36-38 kD. In inhibitory immunoblot, IgE binding to ginkgo pollen proteins was almost completely inhibited by oak, ryegrass, mugwort and ragweed, but only partially by hop Japanese and rBet v 2. Conclusion: The skin reactivity rate to ginkgo pollen is approximately 4.7% in a population of Korean subjects with respiratory allergy. Since ginkgo pollen has a high cross-reactivity with other prevalent pollens, it could cause clinical symptoms during its pollen season by cross-reacting with the IgE produced in response to other pollens in patients sensitized to multiple pollens.

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