Imaging of the inflammatory response in reperfusion injury after transient cerebral ischemia in rats: Correlation of superparamagnetic iron oxide-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging with histopathology

J. Kim, D. I. Kim, S. K. Lee, D. J. Kim, J. E. Lee, S. K. Ahn

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

22 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Acute inflammatory responses have been thought to play a central role in ischemia-reperfusion injury after acute ischemic stroke. Superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) particles have been known to enable in-vivo monitoring of macrophage infiltration by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the experimental ischemic rat brain. Purpose: To determine whether the accumulation of macrophages could be seen in vivo in a reperfusion animal model after focal cerebral ischemia using SPIO-enhanced MRI. Material and Methods: Thirty-four adult male rats were enrolled in this study. SPIO particles were injected into the rats at different time points after 1-hour transient occlusion of the middle cerebral artery, and three-dimensional (3D) T2*-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) images with a gradient-echo sequence were performed 24 hours later. Histochemical iron staining was compared with T2* signal abnormalities. Results: At days 3 and 4 post-reperfusion, focal areas of signal loss indicating local accumulation of SPIO particles appeared in a part of the damaged brain. Areas of signal loss corresponded to local accumulation of iron-laden macrophages in histologic sections, and SPIO-induced signal loss indicated active macrophage transmigration into the reperfused brain. Conclusion: SPIO-enhanced MRI demonstrated through in-vivo monitoring that macrophages participate in reperfusion injury at early stages of injury development. SPIO-enhanced MRI could be a useful tool to examine the inflammatory mechanisms involved in reperfusion brain injury.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)580-588
Number of pages9
JournalActa Radiologica
Volume49
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2008 Jul 7

Fingerprint

Transient Ischemic Attack
Reperfusion Injury
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Macrophages
Reperfusion
Brain
Iron
Middle Cerebral Artery Infarction
ferric oxide
Brain Ischemia
Brain Injuries
Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy
Animal Models
Stroke
Staining and Labeling
Wounds and Injuries

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Radiological and Ultrasound Technology
  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging

Cite this

@article{5371e46bd0784812bacc83f54611798a,
title = "Imaging of the inflammatory response in reperfusion injury after transient cerebral ischemia in rats: Correlation of superparamagnetic iron oxide-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging with histopathology",
abstract = "Background: Acute inflammatory responses have been thought to play a central role in ischemia-reperfusion injury after acute ischemic stroke. Superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) particles have been known to enable in-vivo monitoring of macrophage infiltration by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the experimental ischemic rat brain. Purpose: To determine whether the accumulation of macrophages could be seen in vivo in a reperfusion animal model after focal cerebral ischemia using SPIO-enhanced MRI. Material and Methods: Thirty-four adult male rats were enrolled in this study. SPIO particles were injected into the rats at different time points after 1-hour transient occlusion of the middle cerebral artery, and three-dimensional (3D) T2*-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) images with a gradient-echo sequence were performed 24 hours later. Histochemical iron staining was compared with T2* signal abnormalities. Results: At days 3 and 4 post-reperfusion, focal areas of signal loss indicating local accumulation of SPIO particles appeared in a part of the damaged brain. Areas of signal loss corresponded to local accumulation of iron-laden macrophages in histologic sections, and SPIO-induced signal loss indicated active macrophage transmigration into the reperfused brain. Conclusion: SPIO-enhanced MRI demonstrated through in-vivo monitoring that macrophages participate in reperfusion injury at early stages of injury development. SPIO-enhanced MRI could be a useful tool to examine the inflammatory mechanisms involved in reperfusion brain injury.",
author = "J. Kim and Kim, {D. I.} and Lee, {S. K.} and Kim, {D. J.} and Lee, {J. E.} and Ahn, {S. K.}",
year = "2008",
month = "7",
day = "7",
doi = "10.1080/02841850802020484",
language = "English",
volume = "49",
pages = "580--588",
journal = "Acta Radiologica",
issn = "0284-1851",
publisher = "SAGE Publications Ltd",
number = "5",

}

Imaging of the inflammatory response in reperfusion injury after transient cerebral ischemia in rats : Correlation of superparamagnetic iron oxide-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging with histopathology. / Kim, J.; Kim, D. I.; Lee, S. K.; Kim, D. J.; Lee, J. E.; Ahn, S. K.

In: Acta Radiologica, Vol. 49, No. 5, 07.07.2008, p. 580-588.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Imaging of the inflammatory response in reperfusion injury after transient cerebral ischemia in rats

T2 - Correlation of superparamagnetic iron oxide-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging with histopathology

AU - Kim, J.

AU - Kim, D. I.

AU - Lee, S. K.

AU - Kim, D. J.

AU - Lee, J. E.

AU - Ahn, S. K.

PY - 2008/7/7

Y1 - 2008/7/7

N2 - Background: Acute inflammatory responses have been thought to play a central role in ischemia-reperfusion injury after acute ischemic stroke. Superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) particles have been known to enable in-vivo monitoring of macrophage infiltration by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the experimental ischemic rat brain. Purpose: To determine whether the accumulation of macrophages could be seen in vivo in a reperfusion animal model after focal cerebral ischemia using SPIO-enhanced MRI. Material and Methods: Thirty-four adult male rats were enrolled in this study. SPIO particles were injected into the rats at different time points after 1-hour transient occlusion of the middle cerebral artery, and three-dimensional (3D) T2*-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) images with a gradient-echo sequence were performed 24 hours later. Histochemical iron staining was compared with T2* signal abnormalities. Results: At days 3 and 4 post-reperfusion, focal areas of signal loss indicating local accumulation of SPIO particles appeared in a part of the damaged brain. Areas of signal loss corresponded to local accumulation of iron-laden macrophages in histologic sections, and SPIO-induced signal loss indicated active macrophage transmigration into the reperfused brain. Conclusion: SPIO-enhanced MRI demonstrated through in-vivo monitoring that macrophages participate in reperfusion injury at early stages of injury development. SPIO-enhanced MRI could be a useful tool to examine the inflammatory mechanisms involved in reperfusion brain injury.

AB - Background: Acute inflammatory responses have been thought to play a central role in ischemia-reperfusion injury after acute ischemic stroke. Superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) particles have been known to enable in-vivo monitoring of macrophage infiltration by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the experimental ischemic rat brain. Purpose: To determine whether the accumulation of macrophages could be seen in vivo in a reperfusion animal model after focal cerebral ischemia using SPIO-enhanced MRI. Material and Methods: Thirty-four adult male rats were enrolled in this study. SPIO particles were injected into the rats at different time points after 1-hour transient occlusion of the middle cerebral artery, and three-dimensional (3D) T2*-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) images with a gradient-echo sequence were performed 24 hours later. Histochemical iron staining was compared with T2* signal abnormalities. Results: At days 3 and 4 post-reperfusion, focal areas of signal loss indicating local accumulation of SPIO particles appeared in a part of the damaged brain. Areas of signal loss corresponded to local accumulation of iron-laden macrophages in histologic sections, and SPIO-induced signal loss indicated active macrophage transmigration into the reperfused brain. Conclusion: SPIO-enhanced MRI demonstrated through in-vivo monitoring that macrophages participate in reperfusion injury at early stages of injury development. SPIO-enhanced MRI could be a useful tool to examine the inflammatory mechanisms involved in reperfusion brain injury.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=46149109247&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=46149109247&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1080/02841850802020484

DO - 10.1080/02841850802020484

M3 - Article

C2 - 18568546

AN - SCOPUS:46149109247

VL - 49

SP - 580

EP - 588

JO - Acta Radiologica

JF - Acta Radiologica

SN - 0284-1851

IS - 5

ER -