Impact of socioeconomic status and subjective social class on overall and health-related quality of life

Jae Hyun Kim, Eun Cheol Park

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Our objective was to investigate the impact of socioeconomic status and subjective social class on health-related quality of life (HRQOL) vs. overall quality of life (QOL). Methods: We performed a longitudinal analysis using data regarding 8250 individuals drawn from the Korean Longitudinal Study of Aging (KLoSA). We analyzed differences between HRQOL and QOL in individuals of various socioeconomic strata (high, middle, or low household income and education levels) and subjective social classes (high, middle, or low) at baseline (2009). Results: Individuals with low household incomes and of low subjective social class had the highest probability of reporting discrepant HRQOL and QOL scores (B: 4.796; P < 0.0001), whereas individuals with high household incomes and high subjective social class had the lowest probability of discrepant HRQOL and QOL scores (B: -3.625; P = 0.000). Similar trends were seen when education was used as a proxy for socioeconomic status. Conclusion: In conclusion, both household income/subjective social class and education/subjective social class were found to have an impact on the degree of divergence between QOL and HRQOL. Therefore, in designing interventions, socioeconomic inequalities should be taken into account through the use of multi-dimensional measurement tools.

Original languageEnglish
Article number783
JournalBMC Public Health
Volume15
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015 Aug 15

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Social Class
Quality of Life
Education
Proxy
Longitudinal Studies

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

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Impact of socioeconomic status and subjective social class on overall and health-related quality of life. / Kim, Jae Hyun; Park, Eun Cheol.

In: BMC Public Health, Vol. 15, No. 1, 783, 15.08.2015.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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