Impact of timing of conversion to open surgery on short-term and oncologic outcomes in patients undergoing minimally invasive surgery for colorectal cancer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

To evaluate the influence of timing of open conversion on short-termand oncologic outcomes after minimally invasive surgery for colorectal cancer. Six hundred forty-six consecutive patients were enrolled. All patients converted to open surgery were classified into early (n 5 10) or late (n 5 67) groups based on conversion timing using a 60-minute cutoff. A comparison of early conversion and nonconverted groups showed that history of prior abdominal surgery and pT4 tumor was more common in the early conversion group. Mean operative time was longer in the early conversion group. Rates of 30-day postoperative complications (30% vs 27%), time to soft diet (5 days vs 5 days), and hospital stay (12 days vs 12 days) were not different. A comparison of the late and nonconverted groups showed that history of prior abdominal surgery was more common in the late conversion group. Mean operative time was longer in the late conversion. Rates of 30-day postoperative complications (42% vs 27%), Clavien-Dindo score ≥3 (22%vs 11%), intensive care unit care (31% vs 15%), and transfusion (37% vs 21%) were significantly higher in the late conversion group. Time to soft diet (6 days vs 5 days) and hospital stay (15 days vs 12 days, P5 0.037) were longer in the late conversion group. Cancer-specific and recurrence-free survival rates did not differ among the early, late conversion, and nonconverted groups. Decisions about open conversion need be made within 60 minutes of the beginning of surgery as early conversion does not worsen short-term and oncologic outcomes.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)71-77
Number of pages7
JournalAmerican Surgeon
Volume83
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - 2017 Jan 1

Fingerprint

Conversion to Open Surgery
Minimally Invasive Surgical Procedures
Colorectal Neoplasms
Operative Time
Length of Stay
Diet
Intensive Care Units
Neoplasms
Survival Rate
Recurrence

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Surgery

Cite this

@article{c5dbfe621d1a42918fb4134283190383,
title = "Impact of timing of conversion to open surgery on short-term and oncologic outcomes in patients undergoing minimally invasive surgery for colorectal cancer",
abstract = "To evaluate the influence of timing of open conversion on short-termand oncologic outcomes after minimally invasive surgery for colorectal cancer. Six hundred forty-six consecutive patients were enrolled. All patients converted to open surgery were classified into early (n 5 10) or late (n 5 67) groups based on conversion timing using a 60-minute cutoff. A comparison of early conversion and nonconverted groups showed that history of prior abdominal surgery and pT4 tumor was more common in the early conversion group. Mean operative time was longer in the early conversion group. Rates of 30-day postoperative complications (30{\%} vs 27{\%}), time to soft diet (5 days vs 5 days), and hospital stay (12 days vs 12 days) were not different. A comparison of the late and nonconverted groups showed that history of prior abdominal surgery was more common in the late conversion group. Mean operative time was longer in the late conversion. Rates of 30-day postoperative complications (42{\%} vs 27{\%}), Clavien-Dindo score ≥3 (22{\%}vs 11{\%}), intensive care unit care (31{\%} vs 15{\%}), and transfusion (37{\%} vs 21{\%}) were significantly higher in the late conversion group. Time to soft diet (6 days vs 5 days) and hospital stay (15 days vs 12 days, P5 0.037) were longer in the late conversion group. Cancer-specific and recurrence-free survival rates did not differ among the early, late conversion, and nonconverted groups. Decisions about open conversion need be made within 60 minutes of the beginning of surgery as early conversion does not worsen short-term and oncologic outcomes.",
author = "Kim, {Ik Yong} and Kim, {Bo Ra} and Kim, {Young Wan}",
year = "2017",
month = "1",
day = "1",
language = "English",
volume = "83",
pages = "71--77",
journal = "American Surgeon",
issn = "0003-1348",
publisher = "Southeastern Surgical Congress",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Impact of timing of conversion to open surgery on short-term and oncologic outcomes in patients undergoing minimally invasive surgery for colorectal cancer

AU - Kim, Ik Yong

AU - Kim, Bo Ra

AU - Kim, Young Wan

PY - 2017/1/1

Y1 - 2017/1/1

N2 - To evaluate the influence of timing of open conversion on short-termand oncologic outcomes after minimally invasive surgery for colorectal cancer. Six hundred forty-six consecutive patients were enrolled. All patients converted to open surgery were classified into early (n 5 10) or late (n 5 67) groups based on conversion timing using a 60-minute cutoff. A comparison of early conversion and nonconverted groups showed that history of prior abdominal surgery and pT4 tumor was more common in the early conversion group. Mean operative time was longer in the early conversion group. Rates of 30-day postoperative complications (30% vs 27%), time to soft diet (5 days vs 5 days), and hospital stay (12 days vs 12 days) were not different. A comparison of the late and nonconverted groups showed that history of prior abdominal surgery was more common in the late conversion group. Mean operative time was longer in the late conversion. Rates of 30-day postoperative complications (42% vs 27%), Clavien-Dindo score ≥3 (22%vs 11%), intensive care unit care (31% vs 15%), and transfusion (37% vs 21%) were significantly higher in the late conversion group. Time to soft diet (6 days vs 5 days) and hospital stay (15 days vs 12 days, P5 0.037) were longer in the late conversion group. Cancer-specific and recurrence-free survival rates did not differ among the early, late conversion, and nonconverted groups. Decisions about open conversion need be made within 60 minutes of the beginning of surgery as early conversion does not worsen short-term and oncologic outcomes.

AB - To evaluate the influence of timing of open conversion on short-termand oncologic outcomes after minimally invasive surgery for colorectal cancer. Six hundred forty-six consecutive patients were enrolled. All patients converted to open surgery were classified into early (n 5 10) or late (n 5 67) groups based on conversion timing using a 60-minute cutoff. A comparison of early conversion and nonconverted groups showed that history of prior abdominal surgery and pT4 tumor was more common in the early conversion group. Mean operative time was longer in the early conversion group. Rates of 30-day postoperative complications (30% vs 27%), time to soft diet (5 days vs 5 days), and hospital stay (12 days vs 12 days) were not different. A comparison of the late and nonconverted groups showed that history of prior abdominal surgery was more common in the late conversion group. Mean operative time was longer in the late conversion. Rates of 30-day postoperative complications (42% vs 27%), Clavien-Dindo score ≥3 (22%vs 11%), intensive care unit care (31% vs 15%), and transfusion (37% vs 21%) were significantly higher in the late conversion group. Time to soft diet (6 days vs 5 days) and hospital stay (15 days vs 12 days, P5 0.037) were longer in the late conversion group. Cancer-specific and recurrence-free survival rates did not differ among the early, late conversion, and nonconverted groups. Decisions about open conversion need be made within 60 minutes of the beginning of surgery as early conversion does not worsen short-term and oncologic outcomes.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85015051649&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85015051649&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

C2 - 28234129

AN - SCOPUS:85015051649

VL - 83

SP - 71

EP - 77

JO - American Surgeon

JF - American Surgeon

SN - 0003-1348

IS - 1

ER -