Implantation of bone marrow mononuclear cells using injectable fibrin matrix enhances neovascularization in infarcted myocardium

Ju Hee Ryu, Il Kwon Kim, Seung-Woo Cho, Myeong Chan Cho, Kyung Kuk Hwang, Hainan Piao, Shuguang Piao, Sang Hyun Lim, Yoo Sun Hong, Cha Yong Choi, Kyung Jong Yoo, Byung Soo Kim

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Neovascularization may improve cardiac function and prevent further scar tissue formation in infarcted myocardium. A number of studies have demonstrated that bone marrow-derived cells have the potential to induce neovascularization in ischemic tissues. In this study, we hypothesized that implantation of bone marrow mononuclear cells (BMMNCs) using injectable fibrin matrix further enhances neovascularization in infarcted myocardium compared to BMMNC implantation without matrix. To test this hypothesis, infarction was induced in rat myocardium by cryoinjury. Three weeks later, rat BMMNCs were mixed with fibrin matrix and injected into the infarcted myocardium. Injection of either BMMNCs or medium alone into infarcted myocardium served as controls. Eight weeks after the treatments, histological analyses indicated that implantation of BMMNCs using fibrin matrix resulted in more extensive tissue regeneration in the infarcted myocardium compared to BMMNC implantation without matrix. Examination with fluorescence microscopy revealed that cells labeled with a fluorescent dye prior to implantation survived in the infarcted myocardium at 8 weeks of implantation. Importantly, implantation of BMMNCs using fibrin matrix resulted in much more extensive neovascularization in infarcted myocardium than BMMNC implantation without matrix. The microvessel density in infarcted myocardium was significantly higher (p<0.05) when BMMNCs were implanted using fibrin matrix (350±22 microvessels/mm2) compared to BMMNC implantation without matrix (262±13 microvessels/mm2) and medium injection (76±9 microvessels/mm2). In addition, average internal diameter of microvessels was significantly larger (p<0.05) in BMMNC implantation with fibrin matrix group (14.6±1.2μm) than BMMNC implantation without matrix group (10.2±0.7μm) and medium injection group (7.3±0.5μm). These results suggest that fibrin matrix could serve as a cell implantation matrix that enhances neovascularization efficacy for myocardial infarction treatment.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)319-326
Number of pages8
JournalBiomaterials
Volume26
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2005 Jan 1

Fingerprint

Fibrin
Bone Marrow Cells
Myocardium
Bone
Injections
Microvessels
Rats
Tissue
Tissue regeneration
Fluorescence microscopy
Fluorescent Dyes
Fluorescence Microscopy
Infarction
Cicatrix
Regeneration
Dyes
Myocardial Infarction

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Bioengineering
  • Ceramics and Composites
  • Biophysics
  • Biomaterials
  • Mechanics of Materials

Cite this

Ryu, Ju Hee ; Kim, Il Kwon ; Cho, Seung-Woo ; Cho, Myeong Chan ; Hwang, Kyung Kuk ; Piao, Hainan ; Piao, Shuguang ; Lim, Sang Hyun ; Hong, Yoo Sun ; Choi, Cha Yong ; Yoo, Kyung Jong ; Kim, Byung Soo. / Implantation of bone marrow mononuclear cells using injectable fibrin matrix enhances neovascularization in infarcted myocardium. In: Biomaterials. 2005 ; Vol. 26, No. 3. pp. 319-326.
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abstract = "Neovascularization may improve cardiac function and prevent further scar tissue formation in infarcted myocardium. A number of studies have demonstrated that bone marrow-derived cells have the potential to induce neovascularization in ischemic tissues. In this study, we hypothesized that implantation of bone marrow mononuclear cells (BMMNCs) using injectable fibrin matrix further enhances neovascularization in infarcted myocardium compared to BMMNC implantation without matrix. To test this hypothesis, infarction was induced in rat myocardium by cryoinjury. Three weeks later, rat BMMNCs were mixed with fibrin matrix and injected into the infarcted myocardium. Injection of either BMMNCs or medium alone into infarcted myocardium served as controls. Eight weeks after the treatments, histological analyses indicated that implantation of BMMNCs using fibrin matrix resulted in more extensive tissue regeneration in the infarcted myocardium compared to BMMNC implantation without matrix. Examination with fluorescence microscopy revealed that cells labeled with a fluorescent dye prior to implantation survived in the infarcted myocardium at 8 weeks of implantation. Importantly, implantation of BMMNCs using fibrin matrix resulted in much more extensive neovascularization in infarcted myocardium than BMMNC implantation without matrix. The microvessel density in infarcted myocardium was significantly higher (p<0.05) when BMMNCs were implanted using fibrin matrix (350±22 microvessels/mm2) compared to BMMNC implantation without matrix (262±13 microvessels/mm2) and medium injection (76±9 microvessels/mm2). In addition, average internal diameter of microvessels was significantly larger (p<0.05) in BMMNC implantation with fibrin matrix group (14.6±1.2μm) than BMMNC implantation without matrix group (10.2±0.7μm) and medium injection group (7.3±0.5μm). These results suggest that fibrin matrix could serve as a cell implantation matrix that enhances neovascularization efficacy for myocardial infarction treatment.",
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Ryu, JH, Kim, IK, Cho, S-W, Cho, MC, Hwang, KK, Piao, H, Piao, S, Lim, SH, Hong, YS, Choi, CY, Yoo, KJ & Kim, BS 2005, 'Implantation of bone marrow mononuclear cells using injectable fibrin matrix enhances neovascularization in infarcted myocardium', Biomaterials, vol. 26, no. 3, pp. 319-326. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.biomaterials.2004.02.058

Implantation of bone marrow mononuclear cells using injectable fibrin matrix enhances neovascularization in infarcted myocardium. / Ryu, Ju Hee; Kim, Il Kwon; Cho, Seung-Woo; Cho, Myeong Chan; Hwang, Kyung Kuk; Piao, Hainan; Piao, Shuguang; Lim, Sang Hyun; Hong, Yoo Sun; Choi, Cha Yong; Yoo, Kyung Jong; Kim, Byung Soo.

In: Biomaterials, Vol. 26, No. 3, 01.01.2005, p. 319-326.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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T1 - Implantation of bone marrow mononuclear cells using injectable fibrin matrix enhances neovascularization in infarcted myocardium

AU - Ryu, Ju Hee

AU - Kim, Il Kwon

AU - Cho, Seung-Woo

AU - Cho, Myeong Chan

AU - Hwang, Kyung Kuk

AU - Piao, Hainan

AU - Piao, Shuguang

AU - Lim, Sang Hyun

AU - Hong, Yoo Sun

AU - Choi, Cha Yong

AU - Yoo, Kyung Jong

AU - Kim, Byung Soo

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Y1 - 2005/1/1

N2 - Neovascularization may improve cardiac function and prevent further scar tissue formation in infarcted myocardium. A number of studies have demonstrated that bone marrow-derived cells have the potential to induce neovascularization in ischemic tissues. In this study, we hypothesized that implantation of bone marrow mononuclear cells (BMMNCs) using injectable fibrin matrix further enhances neovascularization in infarcted myocardium compared to BMMNC implantation without matrix. To test this hypothesis, infarction was induced in rat myocardium by cryoinjury. Three weeks later, rat BMMNCs were mixed with fibrin matrix and injected into the infarcted myocardium. Injection of either BMMNCs or medium alone into infarcted myocardium served as controls. Eight weeks after the treatments, histological analyses indicated that implantation of BMMNCs using fibrin matrix resulted in more extensive tissue regeneration in the infarcted myocardium compared to BMMNC implantation without matrix. Examination with fluorescence microscopy revealed that cells labeled with a fluorescent dye prior to implantation survived in the infarcted myocardium at 8 weeks of implantation. Importantly, implantation of BMMNCs using fibrin matrix resulted in much more extensive neovascularization in infarcted myocardium than BMMNC implantation without matrix. The microvessel density in infarcted myocardium was significantly higher (p<0.05) when BMMNCs were implanted using fibrin matrix (350±22 microvessels/mm2) compared to BMMNC implantation without matrix (262±13 microvessels/mm2) and medium injection (76±9 microvessels/mm2). In addition, average internal diameter of microvessels was significantly larger (p<0.05) in BMMNC implantation with fibrin matrix group (14.6±1.2μm) than BMMNC implantation without matrix group (10.2±0.7μm) and medium injection group (7.3±0.5μm). These results suggest that fibrin matrix could serve as a cell implantation matrix that enhances neovascularization efficacy for myocardial infarction treatment.

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