Improvements of the operational rating system for existing residential buildings

Jaewook Jeong, Taehoon Hong, Changyoon Ji, Jimin Kim, Minhyun Lee, Kwangbok Jeong, Choongwan Koo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The Building Energy Consumption Certification (BECC) evaluating the energy performance of existing buildings has been launched since 2016 to reduce the operational energy consumption in existing buildings in South Korea. However, the current BECC has some potential problems, and these problems should be solved to evaluate the energy performance of existing building more accurately. Thus, this study aims to identify the potential problems in the current BEEC using the hypothesis testing. And then this study proposes the improved BECC using the energy benchmarking process and the modified grading process to solve the potential problems. As a result of the hypothesis testing based on the data of 504 multi-family housing complexes (MFHCs), the potential problems were identified as follows: (i) the current classification criteria caused the irrational judgements, and (ii) the current grading system was lacking in its assessment function (over 94% of MFHCs ranked in the average level as grades “C” and “D”). To solve these problems, this study proposed the improved BECC. The energy benchmarking process provides the reasonable classification criteria, and the modified grading process finds the reasonable number of grades and its range. The result of comparative analysis based on 504 MFHCs indicated that the improved BECC could solve the problems in the current BECC. That is, over 94% of MFHCs were ranked in grades “C” and “D” in the current BECC while they were shown in all five grades (i.e., grades “A”, “B”, “C”, “D”, and “E”) in the improved BECC. The policy-makers can more accurately assess the energy performance of existing MFHCs by using the improved BECC.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)112-124
Number of pages13
JournalApplied Energy
Volume193
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017 Jan 1

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certification
Energy utilization
benchmarking
hypothesis testing
energy
Benchmarking
energy consumption
residential building
Testing
family

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Building and Construction
  • Energy(all)
  • Mechanical Engineering
  • Management, Monitoring, Policy and Law

Cite this

Jeong, Jaewook ; Hong, Taehoon ; Ji, Changyoon ; Kim, Jimin ; Lee, Minhyun ; Jeong, Kwangbok ; Koo, Choongwan. / Improvements of the operational rating system for existing residential buildings. In: Applied Energy. 2017 ; Vol. 193. pp. 112-124.
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Improvements of the operational rating system for existing residential buildings. / Jeong, Jaewook; Hong, Taehoon; Ji, Changyoon; Kim, Jimin; Lee, Minhyun; Jeong, Kwangbok; Koo, Choongwan.

In: Applied Energy, Vol. 193, 01.01.2017, p. 112-124.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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