Improving kindergarten readiness in children with developmental disabilities: Changes in neural correlates of response monitoring

Jennifer Martin McDermott, Katherine C. Pears, Jacqueline Bruce, Hyoun Kyoung Kim, Leslie Roos, Karen L. Yoerger, Philip A. Fisher

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Among children diagnosed with developmental delays, difficulties in self-regulation are prominent and have been linked to school readiness problems. The current study sought to examine the impact of the Kids in Transition to School (KITS) school readiness intervention program on self-regulation, with a specific focus on response monitoring skills, among children with developmental delays. Children (n = 20 in the KITS group and n = 21 in a services as usual group) were administered a flanker task during which event-related potential data were collected to examine group differences in response monitoring. Findings indicated that children in the KITS group showed significant enhancement of a neural index of response monitoring post-intervention. Specifically, the KITS group showed a significant change in the magnitude of their feedback-related negativity in response to negative performance feedback from baseline to post-intervention, whereas children in the services as usual group did not. There were no significant differences between the groups for the error-related negativity or the error-related positivity on incorrect trials nor were there group differences in behavioral performance on the task at the post-intervention assessment. Overall, these findings provide support for the plasticity of response monitoring skills in young children and support the growing literature demonstrating improved self-regulation outcomes via intervention that enhances children’s response monitoring.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)187-199
Number of pages13
JournalApplied Neuropsychology: Child
Volume7
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018 Jul 3

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Developmental Disabilities
Disabled Children
Task Performance and Analysis
Evoked Potentials
Self-Control

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

Cite this

McDermott, Jennifer Martin ; Pears, Katherine C. ; Bruce, Jacqueline ; Kim, Hyoun Kyoung ; Roos, Leslie ; Yoerger, Karen L. ; Fisher, Philip A. / Improving kindergarten readiness in children with developmental disabilities : Changes in neural correlates of response monitoring. In: Applied Neuropsychology: Child. 2018 ; Vol. 7, No. 3. pp. 187-199.
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Improving kindergarten readiness in children with developmental disabilities : Changes in neural correlates of response monitoring. / McDermott, Jennifer Martin; Pears, Katherine C.; Bruce, Jacqueline; Kim, Hyoun Kyoung; Roos, Leslie; Yoerger, Karen L.; Fisher, Philip A.

In: Applied Neuropsychology: Child, Vol. 7, No. 3, 03.07.2018, p. 187-199.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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