Impulsivity and the association between the feedback-related negativity and performance on an inhibitory control task in young at-risk children

Leslie E. Roos, Katherine Pears, Jacqueline Bruce, Hyoun Kyoung Kim, Philip A. Fisher

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Identifying neurocognitive processes associated with effective inhibitory control is particularly relevant for individuals at high risk for disruptive behaviors, such as maltreated children. Performance feedback processing during a flanker task was investigated in maltreated preschool-aged children (N=67) via an event-related potential component, the feedback-related negativity (FRN). The functionality of the FRN in children with high impulsivity was of interest, as impulsivity was associated with an exaggerated FRN in previous research. Results showed that high impulsivity was associated with an exaggerated FRN and greater post-error slowing. For children with high impulsivity, there was a correlation between the FRN and accuracy, which was not found in children with low impulsivity. This suggests that an exaggerated FRN is particularly important for children with high impulsivity to maintain effective inhibitory control.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)704-713
Number of pages10
JournalPsychophysiology
Volume52
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015 May 1

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Impulsive Behavior
Preschool Children
Risk-Taking
Evoked Potentials
Research

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Physiology
  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology
  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Physiology (medical)

Cite this

Roos, Leslie E. ; Pears, Katherine ; Bruce, Jacqueline ; Kim, Hyoun Kyoung ; Fisher, Philip A. / Impulsivity and the association between the feedback-related negativity and performance on an inhibitory control task in young at-risk children. In: Psychophysiology. 2015 ; Vol. 52, No. 5. pp. 704-713.
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Impulsivity and the association between the feedback-related negativity and performance on an inhibitory control task in young at-risk children. / Roos, Leslie E.; Pears, Katherine; Bruce, Jacqueline; Kim, Hyoun Kyoung; Fisher, Philip A.

In: Psychophysiology, Vol. 52, No. 5, 01.05.2015, p. 704-713.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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