In Vivo Self-Powered Wireless Transmission Using Biocompatible Flexible Energy Harvesters

Dong Hyun Kim, Hong Ju Shin, Hyunseung Lee, Chang Kyu Jeong, Hyewon Park, Geon Tae Hwang, Ho Yong Lee, Daniel J. Joe, Jae Hyun Han, Seung Hyun Lee, Jaeha Kim, Boyoung Joung, Keon Jae Lee

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

56 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Additional surgeries for implantable biomedical devices are inevitable to replace discharged batteries, but repeated surgeries can be a risk to patients, causing bleeding, inflammation, and infection. Therefore, developing self-powered implantable devices is essential to reduce the patient's physical/psychological pain and financial burden. Although wireless communication plays a critical role in implantable biomedical devices that contain the function of data transmitting, it has never been integrated with in vivo piezoelectric self-powered system due to its high-level power consumption (microwatt-scale). Here, wireless communication, which is essential for a ubiquitous healthcare system, is successfully driven with in vivo energy harvesting enabled by high-performance single-crystalline (1 − x)Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)O3−(x)Pb(Zr,Ti)O3 (PMN-PZT). The PMN-PZT energy harvester generates an open-circuit voltage of 17.8 V and a short-circuit current of 1.74 µA from porcine heartbeats, which are greater by a factor of 4.45 and 17.5 than those of previously reported in vivo piezoelectric energy harvesting. The energy harvester exhibits excellent biocompatibility, which implies the possibility for applying the device to biomedical applications.

Original languageEnglish
Article number1700341
JournalAdvanced Functional Materials
Volume27
Issue number25
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017 Jul 5

Fingerprint

Harvesters
Energy harvesting
Surgery
Communication
wireless communication
Open circuit voltage
Biocompatibility
surgery
Short circuit currents
Electric power utilization
Crystalline materials
bleeding
pain
energy
biocompatibility
infectious diseases
short circuit currents
open circuit voltage
electric batteries

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Chemistry(all)
  • Materials Science(all)
  • Condensed Matter Physics

Cite this

Kim, D. H., Shin, H. J., Lee, H., Jeong, C. K., Park, H., Hwang, G. T., ... Lee, K. J. (2017). In Vivo Self-Powered Wireless Transmission Using Biocompatible Flexible Energy Harvesters. Advanced Functional Materials, 27(25), [1700341]. https://doi.org/10.1002/adfm.201700341
Kim, Dong Hyun ; Shin, Hong Ju ; Lee, Hyunseung ; Jeong, Chang Kyu ; Park, Hyewon ; Hwang, Geon Tae ; Lee, Ho Yong ; Joe, Daniel J. ; Han, Jae Hyun ; Lee, Seung Hyun ; Kim, Jaeha ; Joung, Boyoung ; Lee, Keon Jae. / In Vivo Self-Powered Wireless Transmission Using Biocompatible Flexible Energy Harvesters. In: Advanced Functional Materials. 2017 ; Vol. 27, No. 25.
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Kim, DH, Shin, HJ, Lee, H, Jeong, CK, Park, H, Hwang, GT, Lee, HY, Joe, DJ, Han, JH, Lee, SH, Kim, J, Joung, B & Lee, KJ 2017, 'In Vivo Self-Powered Wireless Transmission Using Biocompatible Flexible Energy Harvesters', Advanced Functional Materials, vol. 27, no. 25, 1700341. https://doi.org/10.1002/adfm.201700341

In Vivo Self-Powered Wireless Transmission Using Biocompatible Flexible Energy Harvesters. / Kim, Dong Hyun; Shin, Hong Ju; Lee, Hyunseung; Jeong, Chang Kyu; Park, Hyewon; Hwang, Geon Tae; Lee, Ho Yong; Joe, Daniel J.; Han, Jae Hyun; Lee, Seung Hyun; Kim, Jaeha; Joung, Boyoung; Lee, Keon Jae.

In: Advanced Functional Materials, Vol. 27, No. 25, 1700341, 05.07.2017.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Hwang, Geon Tae

AU - Lee, Ho Yong

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AU - Joung, Boyoung

AU - Lee, Keon Jae

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