In vivo skin reactions from pulsed-type, bipolar, alternating current radiofrequency treatment using invasive noninsulated electrodes

S. B. Cho, J. Na, Z. Zheng, J. M. Lim, J. S. Kang, JuHee Lee, S. E. Lee

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Bipolar, alternating current radiofrequency (RF) conduction using invasive noninsulated electrodes consecutively generates independent tissue coagulation around each electrode and then, the converged coagulation columns. Methods: Two pulsed-type RF models at the on-time pulse width/pulse pack of 30 and 40 milliseconds were designed to amplify the early stage of RF-induced tissue reaction using hairless mouse skin in vivo. Then, structural and ultrastructural changes were evaluated in hairless mouse skin samples at baseline and immediately 1 day, 3 days, 7 days, and 14 days after treatment. Results: Immediately after pulsed-RF treatment, a few chrysanthemum-like zones of electrothermal coagulation and hypereosinophilic collagen fibers were found in the dermis and dermo-subcutaneous fat junction. Histochemical staining for periodic acid-Schiff and immunohistochemical staining for type IV collagen revealed marked thickening of basement membranes. Transmission electron microscopy demonstrated that pulsed-RF treatment resulted in higher electron-dense and remarkably thicker lamina densa, as well as increases in anchoring fibrils, compared with untreated control specimens. Furthermore, CD31-positive blood vessels were smaller in size with a slit-like luminal appearance, without excessive damage to endothelial cells. Conclusion: Our data indicated that pulse-type, bipolar RF energy induces structural and ultrastructural changes in basement membranes and vascular components in hairless mouse skin.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)318-325
Number of pages8
JournalSkin Research and Technology
Volume24
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018 May 1

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Hairless Mouse
Pulsed Radiofrequency Treatment
Pulse
Electrodes
Basement Membrane
Skin
Blood Vessels
Chrysanthemum
Staining and Labeling
Periodic Acid
Collagen Type IV
Subcutaneous Fat
Dermis
Transmission Electron Microscopy
Collagen
Therapeutics
Endothelial Cells
Electrons

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Dermatology

Cite this

Cho, S. B. ; Na, J. ; Zheng, Z. ; Lim, J. M. ; Kang, J. S. ; Lee, JuHee ; Lee, S. E. / In vivo skin reactions from pulsed-type, bipolar, alternating current radiofrequency treatment using invasive noninsulated electrodes. In: Skin Research and Technology. 2018 ; Vol. 24, No. 2. pp. 318-325.
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abstract = "Background: Bipolar, alternating current radiofrequency (RF) conduction using invasive noninsulated electrodes consecutively generates independent tissue coagulation around each electrode and then, the converged coagulation columns. Methods: Two pulsed-type RF models at the on-time pulse width/pulse pack of 30 and 40 milliseconds were designed to amplify the early stage of RF-induced tissue reaction using hairless mouse skin in vivo. Then, structural and ultrastructural changes were evaluated in hairless mouse skin samples at baseline and immediately 1 day, 3 days, 7 days, and 14 days after treatment. Results: Immediately after pulsed-RF treatment, a few chrysanthemum-like zones of electrothermal coagulation and hypereosinophilic collagen fibers were found in the dermis and dermo-subcutaneous fat junction. Histochemical staining for periodic acid-Schiff and immunohistochemical staining for type IV collagen revealed marked thickening of basement membranes. Transmission electron microscopy demonstrated that pulsed-RF treatment resulted in higher electron-dense and remarkably thicker lamina densa, as well as increases in anchoring fibrils, compared with untreated control specimens. Furthermore, CD31-positive blood vessels were smaller in size with a slit-like luminal appearance, without excessive damage to endothelial cells. Conclusion: Our data indicated that pulse-type, bipolar RF energy induces structural and ultrastructural changes in basement membranes and vascular components in hairless mouse skin.",
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In vivo skin reactions from pulsed-type, bipolar, alternating current radiofrequency treatment using invasive noninsulated electrodes. / Cho, S. B.; Na, J.; Zheng, Z.; Lim, J. M.; Kang, J. S.; Lee, JuHee; Lee, S. E.

In: Skin Research and Technology, Vol. 24, No. 2, 01.05.2018, p. 318-325.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Lee, JuHee

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