In vivo 1H magnetic resonance spectroscopy of amniotic fluid and fetal lung at 1.5 T

Technical challenges

Donghyun Kim, Kiarash Vahidi, Aaron B. Caughey, Fergus V. Coakley, Daniel B. Vigneron, John Kurhanewicz, Ben Mow, Bonnie N. Joe

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: To identify the major technical challenges associated with in utero single-voxel proton spectroscopy of amniotic fluid and fetal lung and to evaluate the feasibility of performing in utero fetal spectroscopy for fetal lung maturity testing. Materials and Methods: Fetal magnetic resonance (MR) spectroscopy of amniotic fluid and fetal lung were performed at 1.5 T in 8 near-term pregnant women. Presence/absence of lactate and choline peaks was tabulated. Ex vivo spectra were obtained from amniotic fluid samples to investigate and refine sequence parameters. Results: Spectroscopy failed in 3 of 8 cases due to maternal discomfort (n = 1) or fetal gastroschisis (n = 2). Both fetal motion and low signal-to-noise ratio were limiting factors for the remaining 5 clinical in vivo studies at 1.5 T. Ex vivo and in vivo studies suggested feasibility for detecting lactate from amniotic fluid within a reasonable clinical scan time (4-5 minutes). Lactate was detected in 3 of 5 patients. Choline detection was limited and was detected in 1 patient. Conclusion: Minor motion effects can be overcome but continuous fetal motion is problematic. Lactate detection seems clinically feasible; but choline detection requires additional technical development and, potentially, further imaging at a higher field strength because of the low signal-to-noise ratio at 1.5 T.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1033-1038
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Volume28
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2008 Jan 1

Fingerprint

Amniotic Fluid
Lactic Acid
Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy
Choline
Spectrum Analysis
Lung
Signal-To-Noise Ratio
Gastroschisis
Feasibility Studies
Protons
Pregnant Women
Mothers

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging

Cite this

Kim, D., Vahidi, K., Caughey, A. B., Coakley, F. V., Vigneron, D. B., Kurhanewicz, J., ... Joe, B. N. (2008). In vivo 1H magnetic resonance spectroscopy of amniotic fluid and fetal lung at 1.5 T: Technical challenges. Journal of Magnetic Resonance Imaging, 28(4), 1033-1038. https://doi.org/10.1002/jmri.21528
Kim, Donghyun ; Vahidi, Kiarash ; Caughey, Aaron B. ; Coakley, Fergus V. ; Vigneron, Daniel B. ; Kurhanewicz, John ; Mow, Ben ; Joe, Bonnie N. / In vivo 1H magnetic resonance spectroscopy of amniotic fluid and fetal lung at 1.5 T : Technical challenges. In: Journal of Magnetic Resonance Imaging. 2008 ; Vol. 28, No. 4. pp. 1033-1038.
@article{46296efb1ead48dd8976c7f81cc4cbdc,
title = "In vivo 1H magnetic resonance spectroscopy of amniotic fluid and fetal lung at 1.5 T: Technical challenges",
abstract = "Purpose: To identify the major technical challenges associated with in utero single-voxel proton spectroscopy of amniotic fluid and fetal lung and to evaluate the feasibility of performing in utero fetal spectroscopy for fetal lung maturity testing. Materials and Methods: Fetal magnetic resonance (MR) spectroscopy of amniotic fluid and fetal lung were performed at 1.5 T in 8 near-term pregnant women. Presence/absence of lactate and choline peaks was tabulated. Ex vivo spectra were obtained from amniotic fluid samples to investigate and refine sequence parameters. Results: Spectroscopy failed in 3 of 8 cases due to maternal discomfort (n = 1) or fetal gastroschisis (n = 2). Both fetal motion and low signal-to-noise ratio were limiting factors for the remaining 5 clinical in vivo studies at 1.5 T. Ex vivo and in vivo studies suggested feasibility for detecting lactate from amniotic fluid within a reasonable clinical scan time (4-5 minutes). Lactate was detected in 3 of 5 patients. Choline detection was limited and was detected in 1 patient. Conclusion: Minor motion effects can be overcome but continuous fetal motion is problematic. Lactate detection seems clinically feasible; but choline detection requires additional technical development and, potentially, further imaging at a higher field strength because of the low signal-to-noise ratio at 1.5 T.",
author = "Donghyun Kim and Kiarash Vahidi and Caughey, {Aaron B.} and Coakley, {Fergus V.} and Vigneron, {Daniel B.} and John Kurhanewicz and Ben Mow and Joe, {Bonnie N.}",
year = "2008",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1002/jmri.21528",
language = "English",
volume = "28",
pages = "1033--1038",
journal = "Journal of Magnetic Resonance Imaging",
issn = "1053-1807",
publisher = "John Wiley and Sons Inc.",
number = "4",

}

Kim, D, Vahidi, K, Caughey, AB, Coakley, FV, Vigneron, DB, Kurhanewicz, J, Mow, B & Joe, BN 2008, 'In vivo 1H magnetic resonance spectroscopy of amniotic fluid and fetal lung at 1.5 T: Technical challenges', Journal of Magnetic Resonance Imaging, vol. 28, no. 4, pp. 1033-1038. https://doi.org/10.1002/jmri.21528

In vivo 1H magnetic resonance spectroscopy of amniotic fluid and fetal lung at 1.5 T : Technical challenges. / Kim, Donghyun; Vahidi, Kiarash; Caughey, Aaron B.; Coakley, Fergus V.; Vigneron, Daniel B.; Kurhanewicz, John; Mow, Ben; Joe, Bonnie N.

In: Journal of Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Vol. 28, No. 4, 01.01.2008, p. 1033-1038.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - In vivo 1H magnetic resonance spectroscopy of amniotic fluid and fetal lung at 1.5 T

T2 - Technical challenges

AU - Kim, Donghyun

AU - Vahidi, Kiarash

AU - Caughey, Aaron B.

AU - Coakley, Fergus V.

AU - Vigneron, Daniel B.

AU - Kurhanewicz, John

AU - Mow, Ben

AU - Joe, Bonnie N.

PY - 2008/1/1

Y1 - 2008/1/1

N2 - Purpose: To identify the major technical challenges associated with in utero single-voxel proton spectroscopy of amniotic fluid and fetal lung and to evaluate the feasibility of performing in utero fetal spectroscopy for fetal lung maturity testing. Materials and Methods: Fetal magnetic resonance (MR) spectroscopy of amniotic fluid and fetal lung were performed at 1.5 T in 8 near-term pregnant women. Presence/absence of lactate and choline peaks was tabulated. Ex vivo spectra were obtained from amniotic fluid samples to investigate and refine sequence parameters. Results: Spectroscopy failed in 3 of 8 cases due to maternal discomfort (n = 1) or fetal gastroschisis (n = 2). Both fetal motion and low signal-to-noise ratio were limiting factors for the remaining 5 clinical in vivo studies at 1.5 T. Ex vivo and in vivo studies suggested feasibility for detecting lactate from amniotic fluid within a reasonable clinical scan time (4-5 minutes). Lactate was detected in 3 of 5 patients. Choline detection was limited and was detected in 1 patient. Conclusion: Minor motion effects can be overcome but continuous fetal motion is problematic. Lactate detection seems clinically feasible; but choline detection requires additional technical development and, potentially, further imaging at a higher field strength because of the low signal-to-noise ratio at 1.5 T.

AB - Purpose: To identify the major technical challenges associated with in utero single-voxel proton spectroscopy of amniotic fluid and fetal lung and to evaluate the feasibility of performing in utero fetal spectroscopy for fetal lung maturity testing. Materials and Methods: Fetal magnetic resonance (MR) spectroscopy of amniotic fluid and fetal lung were performed at 1.5 T in 8 near-term pregnant women. Presence/absence of lactate and choline peaks was tabulated. Ex vivo spectra were obtained from amniotic fluid samples to investigate and refine sequence parameters. Results: Spectroscopy failed in 3 of 8 cases due to maternal discomfort (n = 1) or fetal gastroschisis (n = 2). Both fetal motion and low signal-to-noise ratio were limiting factors for the remaining 5 clinical in vivo studies at 1.5 T. Ex vivo and in vivo studies suggested feasibility for detecting lactate from amniotic fluid within a reasonable clinical scan time (4-5 minutes). Lactate was detected in 3 of 5 patients. Choline detection was limited and was detected in 1 patient. Conclusion: Minor motion effects can be overcome but continuous fetal motion is problematic. Lactate detection seems clinically feasible; but choline detection requires additional technical development and, potentially, further imaging at a higher field strength because of the low signal-to-noise ratio at 1.5 T.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=53549111616&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=53549111616&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1002/jmri.21528

DO - 10.1002/jmri.21528

M3 - Article

VL - 28

SP - 1033

EP - 1038

JO - Journal of Magnetic Resonance Imaging

JF - Journal of Magnetic Resonance Imaging

SN - 1053-1807

IS - 4

ER -