Inactivation of Enterobacter sakazakii inoculated on formulated infant foods by intense pulsed light treatment

Mun Sil Choi, Chan Ick Cheigh, Eun Ae Jeong, Jung Kue Shin, Ji Yong Park, Kyung Bin Song, Jong Hyun Park, Ki Sung Kwon, Myong Soo Chung

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Enterobacter sakazakii is a representative microorganism whose presence in infant foods can cause serious disease. The purposes of this study were to determine the inactivation effects of intense pulsed light (IPL) on E. sakazakii and the commercial feasibility of this sterilization method. The inactivation of E. sakazakii increased with increasing electric power and treatment time. The cells were reduced by 5 log cycles for 4.6 and 1.8 msec of treatment at 10 and 15 kV of electric field strength, respectively. The sterilization effects on commercial infant foods were investigated at 15 kV. The cell population in an infant beverage, an infant meal, and an infant powdered milk product inoculated with E. sakazakii were inactivated exponentially as a function of time and reduced by 4.0, 2.5, and 1.5 log cycles for 9.4, 7.0, and 7.0 msec of treatment time, respectively.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1537-1540
Number of pages4
JournalFood Science and Biotechnology
Volume18
Issue number6
Publication statusPublished - 2009 Dec 1

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Cronobacter sakazakii
Infant Food
Formulated Food
infant foods
inactivation
Light
electrical treatment
electric power
dried milk
Beverages
electric field
Therapeutics
beverages
dairy products
Meals
Milk
cells
microorganisms
Population

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biotechnology
  • Food Science
  • Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology

Cite this

Choi, M. S., Cheigh, C. I., Jeong, E. A., Shin, J. K., Park, J. Y., Song, K. B., ... Chung, M. S. (2009). Inactivation of Enterobacter sakazakii inoculated on formulated infant foods by intense pulsed light treatment. Food Science and Biotechnology, 18(6), 1537-1540.
Choi, Mun Sil ; Cheigh, Chan Ick ; Jeong, Eun Ae ; Shin, Jung Kue ; Park, Ji Yong ; Song, Kyung Bin ; Park, Jong Hyun ; Kwon, Ki Sung ; Chung, Myong Soo. / Inactivation of Enterobacter sakazakii inoculated on formulated infant foods by intense pulsed light treatment. In: Food Science and Biotechnology. 2009 ; Vol. 18, No. 6. pp. 1537-1540.
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Choi, MS, Cheigh, CI, Jeong, EA, Shin, JK, Park, JY, Song, KB, Park, JH, Kwon, KS & Chung, MS 2009, 'Inactivation of Enterobacter sakazakii inoculated on formulated infant foods by intense pulsed light treatment', Food Science and Biotechnology, vol. 18, no. 6, pp. 1537-1540.

Inactivation of Enterobacter sakazakii inoculated on formulated infant foods by intense pulsed light treatment. / Choi, Mun Sil; Cheigh, Chan Ick; Jeong, Eun Ae; Shin, Jung Kue; Park, Ji Yong; Song, Kyung Bin; Park, Jong Hyun; Kwon, Ki Sung; Chung, Myong Soo.

In: Food Science and Biotechnology, Vol. 18, No. 6, 01.12.2009, p. 1537-1540.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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