Indiscriminate friendliness in maltreated foster children

Katherine C. Pears, Jacqueline Bruce, Philip A. Fisher, Hyoun Kyoung Kim

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

55 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Indiscriminate friendliness is well documented in children adopted internationally following institutional rearing but is less studied in maltreated foster children. Precursors and correlates of indiscriminate friendliness were examined in 93 preschool-aged maltreated children residing in foster care and 60 age-matched, nonmaltreated children living with their biological parents. Measures included parent reports, official case record data, and standardized laboratory assessments. Foster children exhibited higher levels of indiscriminate friendliness than nonmaltreated children. Inhibitory control was negatively associated with indiscriminate friendliness even after controlling for age and general cognitive ability. Additionally, the foster children who had experienced a greater number of foster caregivers had poorer inhibitory control, which was in turn associated with greater indiscriminate friendliness. The results indicate a greater prevalence of indiscriminate friendliness among foster children and suggest that indiscriminate friendliness is part of a larger pattern of dysregulation associated with inconsistency in caregiving.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)64-75
Number of pages12
JournalChild Maltreatment
Volume15
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2010 Feb 1

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Aptitude
Caregivers
Parents

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

Cite this

Pears, Katherine C. ; Bruce, Jacqueline ; Fisher, Philip A. ; Kim, Hyoun Kyoung. / Indiscriminate friendliness in maltreated foster children. In: Child Maltreatment. 2010 ; Vol. 15, No. 1. pp. 64-75.
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Indiscriminate friendliness in maltreated foster children. / Pears, Katherine C.; Bruce, Jacqueline; Fisher, Philip A.; Kim, Hyoun Kyoung.

In: Child Maltreatment, Vol. 15, No. 1, 01.02.2010, p. 64-75.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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