Induction of Olfaction and Cancer-Related Genes in Mice Fed a High-Fat Diet as Assessed through the Mode-of-Action by Network Identification Analysis

Youngshim Choi, Cheol Goo Hur, Taesun Park

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The pathophysiological mechanisms underlying the development of obesity and metabolic diseases are not well understood. To gain more insight into the genetic mediators associated with the onset and progression of diet-induced obesity and metabolic diseases, we studied the molecular changes in response to a high-fat diet (HFD) by using a mode-of-action by network identification (MNI) analysis. Oligo DNA microarray analysis was performed on visceral and subcutaneous adipose tissues and muscles of male C57BL/6N mice fed a normal diet or HFD for 2, 4, 8, and 12 weeks. Each of these data was queried against the MNI algorithm, and the lists of top 5 highly ranked genes and gene ontology (GO)-annotated pathways that were significantly overrepresented among the 100 highest ranked genes at each time point in the 3 different tissues of mice fed the HFD were considered in the present study. The 40 highest ranked genes identified by MNI analysis at each time point in the different tissues of mice with diet-induced obesity were subjected to clustering based on their temporal patterns. On the basis of the above-mentioned results, we investigated the sequential induction of distinct olfactory receptors and the stimulation of cancer-related genes during the development of obesity in both adipose tissues and muscles. The top 5 genes recognized using the MNI analysis at each time point and gene cluster identified based on their temporal patterns in the peripheral tissues of mice provided novel and often surprising insights into the potential genetic mediators for obesity progression.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere56610
JournalPloS one
Volume8
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013 Mar 26

Fingerprint

Smell
Neoplasm Genes
High Fat Diet
high fat diet
Nutrition
smell
mechanism of action
Obesity
Genes
Fats
obesity
neoplasms
mice
Tissue
Metabolic Diseases
Diet
genes
metabolic diseases
adipose tissue
Odorant Receptors

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)

Cite this

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Induction of Olfaction and Cancer-Related Genes in Mice Fed a High-Fat Diet as Assessed through the Mode-of-Action by Network Identification Analysis. / Choi, Youngshim; Hur, Cheol Goo; Park, Taesun.

In: PloS one, Vol. 8, No. 3, e56610, 26.03.2013.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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