Influence of offspring on self-rated health among older adults: Evidence from the Korean Longitudinal study of aging (2006-2012)

Jae Hyun Kim, Eun Cheol Park, Yunhwan Lee, Sang Gyu Lee

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2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: We investigated whether offspring protect or jeopardize in parents. Methods: We used data from the Korean Longitudinal Study of Aging and performed a longitudinal analysis of 10,236 individuals at baseline (2006) to estimate the association between offspring-related factors and self-rated health among individuals =45 years of age. Results: The estimate for self-rated health was 0.612 times lower (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.503-0.746; P < 0.0001) for those with zero offspring. The estimate for self-rated health was 0.736 (95% CI, 0.635-0.853; P < 0.0001) for those with five offspring or more. The estimate for self-rated health was 0.707 (95% CI, 0.528-0.947; P=0.020) for males with zero offspring. The estimate for self-rated health was 0.563 (95% CI, 0.422-0.751; P < 0.001) for females with no offspring and for females with five or more offspring. The estimate for self-rated health was 0.686 times lower (95% CI, 0.573-0.822; P < 0.0001) for those with five or more offspring compared to females with two offspring. Conclusion: Those with more offspring (≥5) and those with no offspring tended to have an increased probability of low self-rated health. Overall, our results suggest that offspring have a significant positive effect on self-rated health, which was evident graphically as an inverted U-shape.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)191-199
Number of pages9
JournalKorean Journal of Family Medicine
Volume39
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018 May 1

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
We used data from the 2006 Korean Longitudinal Study of Aging (KLoSA), which was performed by the Korean Labor Institute and funded by the Korean Ministry of Labor. The population of KLoSA participants included adults ≥45 years of age and resident in 15 large administrative areas. Although surveys of the elderly in other countries have studied adults ≥50 years of age, KLoSA extended its population group to include those aged 45–49 years to account for career changes during middle age. This has been an important social issue since the financial crisis in the late 1990s, which caused many people in the 45– 49-year age group to become unemployed.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2018 The Korean Academy of Family Medicine.

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Family Practice

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