Influence of Social Identity on Self-Efficacy Beliefs Through Perceived Social Support: A Social Identity Theory Perspective

Mengfei Guan, Jiyeon So

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

While much research documents the influence of self-efficacy on enactment of health behaviors, relatively less attention has been given to the factors that influence self-efficacy. To enhance our understanding of the various sources of self-efficacy, this study integrated social identity theory into this context and proposed and tested a model, which describes a process through which social identity can influence self-efficacy of engaging in health-related behaviors. Consistent with the proposed meditational model, the findings showed that individuals who had stronger social identity with a given social group perceived greater social support from the group, which in turn predicted higher self-efficacy of engaging in a health-related behavior advocated by the group, and ultimately predicted greater behavioral intention. Theoretical and practical implications are discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)588-604
Number of pages17
JournalCommunication Studies
Volume67
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016 Oct 19

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self-efficacy
social support
Health
health behavior
health
Group

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Communication

Cite this

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Influence of Social Identity on Self-Efficacy Beliefs Through Perceived Social Support : A Social Identity Theory Perspective. / Guan, Mengfei; So, Jiyeon.

In: Communication Studies, Vol. 67, No. 5, 19.10.2016, p. 588-604.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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