Information and affiliation

Disconfirming responses to polar questions and what follows in third position

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Polar questions offer a candidate proposition as a likely possibility, which can be disconfirmed in two different ways. They can be disconfirmed with what this paper terms ‘negation’ responses that merely negate the questioner's candidate proposition, or alternatively, with what this paper terms ‘replacement’ responses that assert a revised state of affairs in replacement of the questioner's proposition. This paper examines questioners’ conduct in third position following these two forms of disconfirmation in Korean conversation. In about 53% of 70 sequences from audio-recordings of ordinary calls and calls to an airline service, questioners produce a question in alignment with the prior disconfirming response in third position. In airline service calls, questioners produce repetitional questions in third position following both negation and replacement responses. They enact registration, establishing correct information on record. In ordinary calls, by contrast, questioners may offer another, revised question following negation responses, whereas producing repetitional questions following replacement responses. They orient to (re-)establishing a common ground with respondents. This paper shows that the different ways in which third-position questions are used can be conditioned by the nature of interaction as well as the form of disconfirmation.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)59-72
Number of pages14
JournalJournal of Pragmatics
Volume100
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016 Jan 1

Fingerprint

candidacy
Audio recordings
recording
conversation
interaction
Polar Questions
Replacement
Negation
Airlines

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Language and Linguistics
  • Linguistics and Language
  • Artificial Intelligence

Cite this

@article{c4f04379d3b547ffb791dcf7c48e4699,
title = "Information and affiliation: Disconfirming responses to polar questions and what follows in third position",
abstract = "Polar questions offer a candidate proposition as a likely possibility, which can be disconfirmed in two different ways. They can be disconfirmed with what this paper terms ‘negation’ responses that merely negate the questioner's candidate proposition, or alternatively, with what this paper terms ‘replacement’ responses that assert a revised state of affairs in replacement of the questioner's proposition. This paper examines questioners’ conduct in third position following these two forms of disconfirmation in Korean conversation. In about 53{\%} of 70 sequences from audio-recordings of ordinary calls and calls to an airline service, questioners produce a question in alignment with the prior disconfirming response in third position. In airline service calls, questioners produce repetitional questions in third position following both negation and replacement responses. They enact registration, establishing correct information on record. In ordinary calls, by contrast, questioners may offer another, revised question following negation responses, whereas producing repetitional questions following replacement responses. They orient to (re-)establishing a common ground with respondents. This paper shows that the different ways in which third-position questions are used can be conditioned by the nature of interaction as well as the form of disconfirmation.",
author = "Seung-Hee Lee",
year = "2016",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.pragma.2015.10.003",
language = "English",
volume = "100",
pages = "59--72",
journal = "Journal of Pragmatics",
issn = "0378-2166",
publisher = "Elsevier",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Information and affiliation

T2 - Disconfirming responses to polar questions and what follows in third position

AU - Lee, Seung-Hee

PY - 2016/1/1

Y1 - 2016/1/1

N2 - Polar questions offer a candidate proposition as a likely possibility, which can be disconfirmed in two different ways. They can be disconfirmed with what this paper terms ‘negation’ responses that merely negate the questioner's candidate proposition, or alternatively, with what this paper terms ‘replacement’ responses that assert a revised state of affairs in replacement of the questioner's proposition. This paper examines questioners’ conduct in third position following these two forms of disconfirmation in Korean conversation. In about 53% of 70 sequences from audio-recordings of ordinary calls and calls to an airline service, questioners produce a question in alignment with the prior disconfirming response in third position. In airline service calls, questioners produce repetitional questions in third position following both negation and replacement responses. They enact registration, establishing correct information on record. In ordinary calls, by contrast, questioners may offer another, revised question following negation responses, whereas producing repetitional questions following replacement responses. They orient to (re-)establishing a common ground with respondents. This paper shows that the different ways in which third-position questions are used can be conditioned by the nature of interaction as well as the form of disconfirmation.

AB - Polar questions offer a candidate proposition as a likely possibility, which can be disconfirmed in two different ways. They can be disconfirmed with what this paper terms ‘negation’ responses that merely negate the questioner's candidate proposition, or alternatively, with what this paper terms ‘replacement’ responses that assert a revised state of affairs in replacement of the questioner's proposition. This paper examines questioners’ conduct in third position following these two forms of disconfirmation in Korean conversation. In about 53% of 70 sequences from audio-recordings of ordinary calls and calls to an airline service, questioners produce a question in alignment with the prior disconfirming response in third position. In airline service calls, questioners produce repetitional questions in third position following both negation and replacement responses. They enact registration, establishing correct information on record. In ordinary calls, by contrast, questioners may offer another, revised question following negation responses, whereas producing repetitional questions following replacement responses. They orient to (re-)establishing a common ground with respondents. This paper shows that the different ways in which third-position questions are used can be conditioned by the nature of interaction as well as the form of disconfirmation.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84949032426&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84949032426&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.pragma.2015.10.003

DO - 10.1016/j.pragma.2015.10.003

M3 - Article

VL - 100

SP - 59

EP - 72

JO - Journal of Pragmatics

JF - Journal of Pragmatics

SN - 0378-2166

ER -