Inhalant use, inhalant-use disorders, and antisocial behavior: Findings from the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions (NESARC)

Matthew O. Howard, Brian E. Perron, Michael G. Vaughn, Kimberly A. Bender, Eric Garland

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

22 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: Few studies have explored the topography of antisocial behavior in a nationally representative sample of inhalant users. We examined (a) the lifetime prevalence of 20 childhood and adult antisocial behaviors in inhalant users with inhalant-use disorders (IUD+) and without IUDs (IUD-); (b) the nature and strength of associations between inhalant use, IUDs, and specific antisocial behaviors in multivariate analyses; and (c) the relationships between inhalant use, IUDs, and antisocial behaviors in a national sample of adults with antisocial personality disorder. Method: The National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions was a multistage national survey of 43,093 U.S. residents. Respondents completed a structured psychiatric interview. Results: IUD+ and IUD- respondents were signifi cantly younger and more likely to be unemployed, to be male, to have never married, and to report family and personal histories of alcohol and drug problems than inhalant nonusers. Family histories of alcohol problems and personal histories of drug problems were signifi cantly more prevalent among IUD+ respondents, compared with IUD- respondents. In bivariate analyses, IUD+ and IUD- respondents evidenced signifi cantly higher lifetime levels of all childhood and adult antisocial behaviors than inhalant nonusers. IUD+ respondents were signifi cantly more likely than their IUD- counterparts to report bullying behavior, starting physical fi ghts, using dangerous weapons, physical cruelty to people, staying out all night without permission, running away, and frequent truancy in childhood, as well as greater deceitfulness, impulsivity, irritability/aggressiveness, recklessness, and irresponsibility in adulthood. Multivariate analyses indicated that IUD+ respondents had a signifi cantly elevated risk for childhood and adult antisocial behaviors, compared with inhalant nonusers, with the strongest effects for using dangerous weapons, physical cruelty to animals, and physical cruelty to people. Similarly, IUD+ respondents differed signifi cantly from their IUD- counterparts primarily across measures of interpersonal violence. Among persons with antisocial personality disorder, inhalant use and IUDs were associated with greater antisocial behavior, albeit with fewer and weaker effects. Conclusions: Respondents with IUDs had pervasively elevated levels of antisocial conduct, including diverse forms of early-onset and interpersonally violent behavior.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)201-209
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs
Volume71
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2010 Mar

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Health(social science)
  • Toxicology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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