Inhibition of extracellular enzyme activities in a forest soil by additions of inorganic nitrogen

Hojeong Kang, Dowon Lee

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Forest ecosystems are known to be nitrogen (N) limited, and productivity often increases with N additions. However, recent studies have suggested that additions of excessive N through atmospheric deposition may affect soil processes adversely. In this study, we conducted a laboratory-based manipulation experiment to reveal the effects of N additions on extracellular enzyme activities in a temperate forest soil. Three different levels of N additions (water-only control, low N addition, and high N addition) were applied to soil columns (2.5-cm diameter x 12 cm height) over 4 weeks. Overall, the additions of N decreased specific activities (enzyme activity per log bacterial cell number) of urease, glutaminase, phosphatase, and arylsulfatase significantly. However, dehydrogenase activity was increased with the high N addition. The results suggest that N deposition may impede nutrient cycling, particularly mineralization of organic nutrients. In addition, this enzyme inhibition may be one of the mechanisms for N retention observed in forest floors.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2129-2135
Number of pages7
JournalCommunications in Soil Science and Plant Analysis
Volume36
Issue number15-16
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2005 Sep 5

Fingerprint

Enzyme inhibition
Enzyme activity
inorganic nitrogen
forest soils
forest soil
enzyme activity
Nitrogen
glutaminase
Soils
temperate soils
arylsulfatase
Nutrients
enzyme inhibition
atmospheric deposition
nitrogen
urease
soil column
nutrient cycling
temperate forests
temperate forest

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Soil Science
  • Agronomy and Crop Science
  • Plant Science
  • Analytical Chemistry

Cite this

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Inhibition of extracellular enzyme activities in a forest soil by additions of inorganic nitrogen. / Kang, Hojeong; Lee, Dowon.

In: Communications in Soil Science and Plant Analysis, Vol. 36, No. 15-16, 05.09.2005, p. 2129-2135.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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