Inhibitory effects of standardized Boesenbergia pandurata extract and its active compound panduratin A on lipopolysaccharide-induced periodontal inflammation and alveolar bone loss in rats

Haebom Kim, Changhee Kim, Kyo Eun Kook, Yanti, Seungmok Choi, Wonku Kang, Jae-Kwan Hwang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Periodontitis, an inflammatory disease of the gingival tissue, triggered by microbial-derived elements, such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS), collapses the periodontal tissues and resorbs the alveolar bone. This study evaluated the inhibitory effects of standardized Boesenbergia pandurata extract (BPE) and panduratin A (PAN) on periodontitis-induced inflammation and alveolar bone loss. Sprague-Dawley rats with LPS-induced periodontitis were orally administered BPE (50 and 200 mg/kg/day) and PAN (20 mg/kg/day) for 8 days. Histological analysis revealed that BPE- and PAN-administered groups showed decreased cell infiltration and alveolar bone resorption. Furthermore, the BPE and PAN significantly alleviated the mRNA and protein expression levels of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB), interleukin-1β, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2, and MMP-8. BPE and PAN also inhibited the expression of nuclear factor of activated T cells, cytoplasmic 1, c-Fos, and ostoclastogenesis-related enzymes, including cathepsin K and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (ALP). BPE and PAN not only upregulated the osteoblastogenesis-associated markers, such as collagen type I (COL1A1) and ALP, but also increased the ratio of osteoprotegerin to receptor activator of NF-κB ligand. Collectively, BPE and PAN efficiently prevent destruction of periodontal tissues and stimulating the loss of alveolar bone tissues, strongly indicative of their potential as natural antiperiodontitis agents.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)961-970
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of medicinal food
Volume21
Issue number10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018 Oct 1

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Zingiberaceae
Alveolar Bone Loss
Lipopolysaccharides
Inflammation
Periodontitis
Gingival Diseases
Cathepsin K
Matrix Metalloproteinase 8
RANK Ligand
NFATC Transcription Factors
Osteoprotegerin
Bone and Bones
NF-kappa B
Matrix Metalloproteinase 2
Bone Resorption
Collagen Type I
panduratin A
Interleukin-1
Sprague Dawley Rats
Messenger RNA

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

Cite this

@article{292417a8a80c4936a472f892b368d8f0,
title = "Inhibitory effects of standardized Boesenbergia pandurata extract and its active compound panduratin A on lipopolysaccharide-induced periodontal inflammation and alveolar bone loss in rats",
abstract = "Periodontitis, an inflammatory disease of the gingival tissue, triggered by microbial-derived elements, such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS), collapses the periodontal tissues and resorbs the alveolar bone. This study evaluated the inhibitory effects of standardized Boesenbergia pandurata extract (BPE) and panduratin A (PAN) on periodontitis-induced inflammation and alveolar bone loss. Sprague-Dawley rats with LPS-induced periodontitis were orally administered BPE (50 and 200 mg/kg/day) and PAN (20 mg/kg/day) for 8 days. Histological analysis revealed that BPE- and PAN-administered groups showed decreased cell infiltration and alveolar bone resorption. Furthermore, the BPE and PAN significantly alleviated the mRNA and protein expression levels of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB), interleukin-1β, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2, and MMP-8. BPE and PAN also inhibited the expression of nuclear factor of activated T cells, cytoplasmic 1, c-Fos, and ostoclastogenesis-related enzymes, including cathepsin K and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (ALP). BPE and PAN not only upregulated the osteoblastogenesis-associated markers, such as collagen type I (COL1A1) and ALP, but also increased the ratio of osteoprotegerin to receptor activator of NF-κB ligand. Collectively, BPE and PAN efficiently prevent destruction of periodontal tissues and stimulating the loss of alveolar bone tissues, strongly indicative of their potential as natural antiperiodontitis agents.",
author = "Haebom Kim and Changhee Kim and Kook, {Kyo Eun} and Yanti and Seungmok Choi and Wonku Kang and Jae-Kwan Hwang",
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Inhibitory effects of standardized Boesenbergia pandurata extract and its active compound panduratin A on lipopolysaccharide-induced periodontal inflammation and alveolar bone loss in rats. / Kim, Haebom; Kim, Changhee; Kook, Kyo Eun; Yanti; Choi, Seungmok; Kang, Wonku; Hwang, Jae-Kwan.

In: Journal of medicinal food, Vol. 21, No. 10, 01.10.2018, p. 961-970.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

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AU - Kim, Haebom

AU - Kim, Changhee

AU - Kook, Kyo Eun

AU - Yanti,

AU - Choi, Seungmok

AU - Kang, Wonku

AU - Hwang, Jae-Kwan

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N2 - Periodontitis, an inflammatory disease of the gingival tissue, triggered by microbial-derived elements, such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS), collapses the periodontal tissues and resorbs the alveolar bone. This study evaluated the inhibitory effects of standardized Boesenbergia pandurata extract (BPE) and panduratin A (PAN) on periodontitis-induced inflammation and alveolar bone loss. Sprague-Dawley rats with LPS-induced periodontitis were orally administered BPE (50 and 200 mg/kg/day) and PAN (20 mg/kg/day) for 8 days. Histological analysis revealed that BPE- and PAN-administered groups showed decreased cell infiltration and alveolar bone resorption. Furthermore, the BPE and PAN significantly alleviated the mRNA and protein expression levels of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB), interleukin-1β, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2, and MMP-8. BPE and PAN also inhibited the expression of nuclear factor of activated T cells, cytoplasmic 1, c-Fos, and ostoclastogenesis-related enzymes, including cathepsin K and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (ALP). BPE and PAN not only upregulated the osteoblastogenesis-associated markers, such as collagen type I (COL1A1) and ALP, but also increased the ratio of osteoprotegerin to receptor activator of NF-κB ligand. Collectively, BPE and PAN efficiently prevent destruction of periodontal tissues and stimulating the loss of alveolar bone tissues, strongly indicative of their potential as natural antiperiodontitis agents.

AB - Periodontitis, an inflammatory disease of the gingival tissue, triggered by microbial-derived elements, such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS), collapses the periodontal tissues and resorbs the alveolar bone. This study evaluated the inhibitory effects of standardized Boesenbergia pandurata extract (BPE) and panduratin A (PAN) on periodontitis-induced inflammation and alveolar bone loss. Sprague-Dawley rats with LPS-induced periodontitis were orally administered BPE (50 and 200 mg/kg/day) and PAN (20 mg/kg/day) for 8 days. Histological analysis revealed that BPE- and PAN-administered groups showed decreased cell infiltration and alveolar bone resorption. Furthermore, the BPE and PAN significantly alleviated the mRNA and protein expression levels of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB), interleukin-1β, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2, and MMP-8. BPE and PAN also inhibited the expression of nuclear factor of activated T cells, cytoplasmic 1, c-Fos, and ostoclastogenesis-related enzymes, including cathepsin K and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (ALP). BPE and PAN not only upregulated the osteoblastogenesis-associated markers, such as collagen type I (COL1A1) and ALP, but also increased the ratio of osteoprotegerin to receptor activator of NF-κB ligand. Collectively, BPE and PAN efficiently prevent destruction of periodontal tissues and stimulating the loss of alveolar bone tissues, strongly indicative of their potential as natural antiperiodontitis agents.

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