Insulin resistance is associated with hypertensive response to exercise in non-diabetic hypertensive patients

Sungha Park, Jaemin Shim, Jin Bae Kim, Young Guk Ko, Donghoon Choi, Jong Won Ha, Se Joong Rim, Yangsoo Jang, Namsik Chung

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Aim: Insulin resistance is associated with increased sympathetic activity and elevated angiotensin II which may contribute to the excessive increase in arterial blood pressure during exercise. In this study, we hypothesized that increased insulin resistance will be significantly associated with hypertensive response to exercise (HRE) in non-diabetic hypertensive patients. Method: Two hundred seventy-five hypertensive patients were included in this study. HOMA-IR index using serum fasting glucose and insulin was calculated for insulin resistance. There were 79 patients with hypertensive response (age 56.1 ± 9.4 years) and 196 patients without hypertensive response (age 53.9 ± 8.9 years). Results: Insulin resistance, assessed by HOMA index, was significantly higher in hypertensive response group as compared to control (HOMA = 2.60 ± 1.54 versus 1.76 ± 0.86, P < 0.001). HOMA was an independent predictor of HRE when controlled for age, sex, BMI and baseline SBP (odds ratio = 2.008, P < 0.001). Also, HOMA was significantly correlated with the magnitude of SBP elevation controlled for age, sex, BMI and baseline SBP as well (β = 0.293, P < 0.001). In conclusion, this study shows that insulin resistance is a significant determinant of hypertensive response to exercise. Further studies to determine the prognostic significance of this finding is warranted.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)65-69
Number of pages5
JournalDiabetes Research and Clinical Practice
Volume73
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2006 Jul 1

Fingerprint

Insulin Resistance
Exercise
Angiotensin II
Fasting
Arterial Pressure
Odds Ratio
Insulin
Glucose
Serum

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Internal Medicine
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Endocrinology

Cite this

Park, Sungha ; Shim, Jaemin ; Kim, Jin Bae ; Ko, Young Guk ; Choi, Donghoon ; Ha, Jong Won ; Rim, Se Joong ; Jang, Yangsoo ; Chung, Namsik. / Insulin resistance is associated with hypertensive response to exercise in non-diabetic hypertensive patients. In: Diabetes Research and Clinical Practice. 2006 ; Vol. 73, No. 1. pp. 65-69.
@article{320fe82d6da146b19baa6e31b91c969f,
title = "Insulin resistance is associated with hypertensive response to exercise in non-diabetic hypertensive patients",
abstract = "Aim: Insulin resistance is associated with increased sympathetic activity and elevated angiotensin II which may contribute to the excessive increase in arterial blood pressure during exercise. In this study, we hypothesized that increased insulin resistance will be significantly associated with hypertensive response to exercise (HRE) in non-diabetic hypertensive patients. Method: Two hundred seventy-five hypertensive patients were included in this study. HOMA-IR index using serum fasting glucose and insulin was calculated for insulin resistance. There were 79 patients with hypertensive response (age 56.1 ± 9.4 years) and 196 patients without hypertensive response (age 53.9 ± 8.9 years). Results: Insulin resistance, assessed by HOMA index, was significantly higher in hypertensive response group as compared to control (HOMA = 2.60 ± 1.54 versus 1.76 ± 0.86, P < 0.001). HOMA was an independent predictor of HRE when controlled for age, sex, BMI and baseline SBP (odds ratio = 2.008, P < 0.001). Also, HOMA was significantly correlated with the magnitude of SBP elevation controlled for age, sex, BMI and baseline SBP as well (β = 0.293, P < 0.001). In conclusion, this study shows that insulin resistance is a significant determinant of hypertensive response to exercise. Further studies to determine the prognostic significance of this finding is warranted.",
author = "Sungha Park and Jaemin Shim and Kim, {Jin Bae} and Ko, {Young Guk} and Donghoon Choi and Ha, {Jong Won} and Rim, {Se Joong} and Yangsoo Jang and Namsik Chung",
year = "2006",
month = "7",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.diabres.2005.11.008",
language = "English",
volume = "73",
pages = "65--69",
journal = "Diabetes Research and Clinical Practice",
issn = "0168-8227",
publisher = "Elsevier Ireland Ltd",
number = "1",

}

Insulin resistance is associated with hypertensive response to exercise in non-diabetic hypertensive patients. / Park, Sungha; Shim, Jaemin; Kim, Jin Bae; Ko, Young Guk; Choi, Donghoon; Ha, Jong Won; Rim, Se Joong; Jang, Yangsoo; Chung, Namsik.

In: Diabetes Research and Clinical Practice, Vol. 73, No. 1, 01.07.2006, p. 65-69.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Insulin resistance is associated with hypertensive response to exercise in non-diabetic hypertensive patients

AU - Park, Sungha

AU - Shim, Jaemin

AU - Kim, Jin Bae

AU - Ko, Young Guk

AU - Choi, Donghoon

AU - Ha, Jong Won

AU - Rim, Se Joong

AU - Jang, Yangsoo

AU - Chung, Namsik

PY - 2006/7/1

Y1 - 2006/7/1

N2 - Aim: Insulin resistance is associated with increased sympathetic activity and elevated angiotensin II which may contribute to the excessive increase in arterial blood pressure during exercise. In this study, we hypothesized that increased insulin resistance will be significantly associated with hypertensive response to exercise (HRE) in non-diabetic hypertensive patients. Method: Two hundred seventy-five hypertensive patients were included in this study. HOMA-IR index using serum fasting glucose and insulin was calculated for insulin resistance. There were 79 patients with hypertensive response (age 56.1 ± 9.4 years) and 196 patients without hypertensive response (age 53.9 ± 8.9 years). Results: Insulin resistance, assessed by HOMA index, was significantly higher in hypertensive response group as compared to control (HOMA = 2.60 ± 1.54 versus 1.76 ± 0.86, P < 0.001). HOMA was an independent predictor of HRE when controlled for age, sex, BMI and baseline SBP (odds ratio = 2.008, P < 0.001). Also, HOMA was significantly correlated with the magnitude of SBP elevation controlled for age, sex, BMI and baseline SBP as well (β = 0.293, P < 0.001). In conclusion, this study shows that insulin resistance is a significant determinant of hypertensive response to exercise. Further studies to determine the prognostic significance of this finding is warranted.

AB - Aim: Insulin resistance is associated with increased sympathetic activity and elevated angiotensin II which may contribute to the excessive increase in arterial blood pressure during exercise. In this study, we hypothesized that increased insulin resistance will be significantly associated with hypertensive response to exercise (HRE) in non-diabetic hypertensive patients. Method: Two hundred seventy-five hypertensive patients were included in this study. HOMA-IR index using serum fasting glucose and insulin was calculated for insulin resistance. There were 79 patients with hypertensive response (age 56.1 ± 9.4 years) and 196 patients without hypertensive response (age 53.9 ± 8.9 years). Results: Insulin resistance, assessed by HOMA index, was significantly higher in hypertensive response group as compared to control (HOMA = 2.60 ± 1.54 versus 1.76 ± 0.86, P < 0.001). HOMA was an independent predictor of HRE when controlled for age, sex, BMI and baseline SBP (odds ratio = 2.008, P < 0.001). Also, HOMA was significantly correlated with the magnitude of SBP elevation controlled for age, sex, BMI and baseline SBP as well (β = 0.293, P < 0.001). In conclusion, this study shows that insulin resistance is a significant determinant of hypertensive response to exercise. Further studies to determine the prognostic significance of this finding is warranted.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=33646775334&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=33646775334&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.diabres.2005.11.008

DO - 10.1016/j.diabres.2005.11.008

M3 - Article

C2 - 16413944

AN - SCOPUS:33646775334

VL - 73

SP - 65

EP - 69

JO - Diabetes Research and Clinical Practice

JF - Diabetes Research and Clinical Practice

SN - 0168-8227

IS - 1

ER -