Integrins, focal adhesions, and cardiac fibroblasts

Ana Maria Manso, seokmin kang, Robert S. Ross

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

30 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

How the myocardium undergoes geometric, structural, and molecular alterations that result in an end phenotype as might be seen in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy or after myocardial infarction is still poorly understood. Structural modification of the left ventricle, which occurs during these pathological states, results from long-term changes in loading conditions and is commonly referred to as Bremodeling." Remodeling" Remodeling may occur from increased wall stress in the face of hypertensive heart disease, valvular disease, or, perhaps most dramatically, after permanent coronary occlusion. A fundamental derangement of myocyte function is the most common perception for the basis of remodeling, but the role of cells in the heart other than the muscle cell must, of course, be considered. Although studies of the myocyte have been extensive, cardiac fibroblasts have been studied less than myocytes. The fibroblast has a broad range of functions in the myocardium ranging from elaboration and remodeling of the extracellular matrix to communication of a range of signals within the heart, including electrical, chemical, and mechanical ones. Integrins are cell surface receptors that are instrumental in mediating cell-matrix interactions in all cells of the organism, including all types within the myocardium. This review will focus on the role of integrins and related proteins in the remodeling process, with a particular emphasis on the cardiac fibroblast.We will illustrate this function by drawing on 2 unique mouse models with perturbation of proteins linked to integrin function.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)856-860
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Investigative Medicine
Volume57
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2009 Jan 1

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Focal Adhesions
Fibroblasts
Integrins
Muscle Cells
Myocardium
Adhesion
Heart Valve Diseases
Coronary Occlusion
Dilated Cardiomyopathy
Cell Surface Receptors
Cardiac Myocytes
Cell Communication
Heart Ventricles
Extracellular Matrix
Proteins
Myocardial Infarction
Communication
Phenotype
Muscle
Cells

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)

Cite this

Manso, Ana Maria ; kang, seokmin ; Ross, Robert S. / Integrins, focal adhesions, and cardiac fibroblasts. In: Journal of Investigative Medicine. 2009 ; Vol. 57, No. 8. pp. 856-860.
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Integrins, focal adhesions, and cardiac fibroblasts. / Manso, Ana Maria; kang, seokmin; Ross, Robert S.

In: Journal of Investigative Medicine, Vol. 57, No. 8, 01.01.2009, p. 856-860.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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