Interleukin 10 polymorphisms differentially influence the risk of gastric cancer in East Asians and Caucasians

Hong Hee Won, Jong Won Kim, Min Ji Kim, Seonwoo Kim, Jun Hee Park, Kyung A. Lee

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Although a number of association studies of gastric cancer (GC) risk have been conducted worldwide, their results have been inconsistent among different populations. The association between GC incidence and Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection is somewhat of an enigma that has yet to be clearly explained. Geographically-restricted positive selection due to unique environmental pressures often result in large allele frequency differences between populations. Thus, population differences need to be investigated when attempting to identify genes that contribute to phenotypes that differ greatly between populations. Methods: We analyzed population differences in 18 polymorphisms of 12 GC-associated or immune response-related genes from 3 ethnic groups comprising 50 Koreans, 46 Indians, and 60 Caucasians; these groups differed in H. pylori seropositivity and susceptibility to GC. Results: An interleukin 10 (IL10) polymorphism demonstrated a significantly different genotype distribution (FST=0.306, P=0.014), indicating a large difference between the Korean and Caucasian populations. The odds ratio of IL10 polymorphism allele between the populations was 38.32 (95% confidence interval, 11.49-127.83). Conclusion: This finding, taken together with previous evidence, provides a possible explanation for previous discrepant association results and supports the idea that IL10 gene polymorphisms can differentially affect GC development among populations.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)73-77
Number of pages5
JournalCytokine
Volume51
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2010 Jul 1

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Polymorphism
Interleukin-10
Stomach Neoplasms
Genes
Population
Helicobacter pylori
Helicobacter Infections
Ethnic Groups
Gene Frequency
Alleles
Odds Ratio
Genotype
Confidence Intervals
Phenotype
Pressure
Incidence

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Immunology
  • Biochemistry
  • Hematology
  • Molecular Biology

Cite this

Won, Hong Hee ; Kim, Jong Won ; Kim, Min Ji ; Kim, Seonwoo ; Park, Jun Hee ; Lee, Kyung A. / Interleukin 10 polymorphisms differentially influence the risk of gastric cancer in East Asians and Caucasians. In: Cytokine. 2010 ; Vol. 51, No. 1. pp. 73-77.
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Interleukin 10 polymorphisms differentially influence the risk of gastric cancer in East Asians and Caucasians. / Won, Hong Hee; Kim, Jong Won; Kim, Min Ji; Kim, Seonwoo; Park, Jun Hee; Lee, Kyung A.

In: Cytokine, Vol. 51, No. 1, 01.07.2010, p. 73-77.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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