International student networks as transnational social capital: illustrations from Japan

Rennie J. Moon, Gi Wook Shin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This paper examines how social isolation in a non-Anglophone context where English is not the main language of instruction for local students but is for international students, has unintended consequences for social capital formation among the latter. What factors influence international student network formation in such places where linguistic barriers are institutionalised and what are their consequences not only during college but beyond, in shaping students’ career plans? Using qualitative interview data with 67 international (originating from Asian countries) and domestic students in Japanese universities, we find that such institutional barriers negatively promote greater isolation of international students but positively encourage the formation of diverse multinational ties–a process through which international students gain ideas, confidence and direction regarding their post-graduation career plans to work transnationally.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)557-574
Number of pages18
JournalComparative Education
Volume55
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2019 Oct 2

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social capital
Japan
student
social isolation
career
language of instruction
capital formation
qualitative interview
confidence
linguistics
university

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Education

Cite this

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International student networks as transnational social capital : illustrations from Japan. / Moon, Rennie J.; Shin, Gi Wook.

In: Comparative Education, Vol. 55, No. 4, 02.10.2019, p. 557-574.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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