Intravascular ultrasound-guided primary percutaneous coronary intervention with drug-eluting stent implantation in patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction

Youngjin Youn, Junghan Yoon, Junwon Lee, Sung Gyun Ahn, Minsoo Ahn, Jang Young Kim, Byungsu Yoo, Seunghwan Lee, Kyung Hoon Choe

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Studies investigating the clinical outcome of intravascular ultrasound (IVUS)-guided primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PPCI) in patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) show conflicting results. The aim of our study was to evaluate whether IVUS-guidedPPCI with drug-eluting stents (DESs) in STEMI patients improves clinical outcome. Hypothesis: IVUS-guided PPCI is superior to angio-guided PPCI. Methods: Three hundred forty-one patients who underwent PPCI for STEMI and survived the hospitalization were enrolled in this study. Two hundred sixteen (63.3%) patients were treated with angio-guided PPCI and 125 (36.7%) patients were treated with IVUS-guided PPCI. The primary endpoint was defined as the composite of death, myocardial infarction, target vessel revascularization, and target lesion revascularization at the 3-year follow-up visit. Results: Male gender, dyslipidemia, and smoking were frequent in the IVUS-guided PPCI group. These patients had a higher rate of radial approach, adjunctive ballooning, thrombectomy, and the use of a glycoprotein IIb/IIIa inhibitor. The number and length of implanted stents were higher in the IVUS-guided PPCI group. The primary end point (18.1% vs 12.8%, P = 0.22) and stent thrombosis (2.8% vs 2.4%, P = 1.00) was not different between the groups. Conclusions: In our observational study, IVUS-guided PPCI with DESs in patients with STEMI did not improve clinical outcome or stent thrombosis.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)706-713
Number of pages8
JournalClinical Cardiology
Volume34
Issue number11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2011 Nov 1

Fingerprint

Drug-Eluting Stents
Percutaneous Coronary Intervention
Myocardial Infarction
Stents
Thrombosis
ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction
Thrombectomy
Platelet Glycoprotein GPIIb-IIIa Complex
Dyslipidemias
Observational Studies
Hospitalization
Smoking

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

@article{e6c10a00a1724fd096c37108f39e3b72,
title = "Intravascular ultrasound-guided primary percutaneous coronary intervention with drug-eluting stent implantation in patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction",
abstract = "Background: Studies investigating the clinical outcome of intravascular ultrasound (IVUS)-guided primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PPCI) in patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) show conflicting results. The aim of our study was to evaluate whether IVUS-guidedPPCI with drug-eluting stents (DESs) in STEMI patients improves clinical outcome. Hypothesis: IVUS-guided PPCI is superior to angio-guided PPCI. Methods: Three hundred forty-one patients who underwent PPCI for STEMI and survived the hospitalization were enrolled in this study. Two hundred sixteen (63.3{\%}) patients were treated with angio-guided PPCI and 125 (36.7{\%}) patients were treated with IVUS-guided PPCI. The primary endpoint was defined as the composite of death, myocardial infarction, target vessel revascularization, and target lesion revascularization at the 3-year follow-up visit. Results: Male gender, dyslipidemia, and smoking were frequent in the IVUS-guided PPCI group. These patients had a higher rate of radial approach, adjunctive ballooning, thrombectomy, and the use of a glycoprotein IIb/IIIa inhibitor. The number and length of implanted stents were higher in the IVUS-guided PPCI group. The primary end point (18.1{\%} vs 12.8{\%}, P = 0.22) and stent thrombosis (2.8{\%} vs 2.4{\%}, P = 1.00) was not different between the groups. Conclusions: In our observational study, IVUS-guided PPCI with DESs in patients with STEMI did not improve clinical outcome or stent thrombosis.",
author = "Youngjin Youn and Junghan Yoon and Junwon Lee and Ahn, {Sung Gyun} and Minsoo Ahn and Kim, {Jang Young} and Byungsu Yoo and Seunghwan Lee and Choe, {Kyung Hoon}",
year = "2011",
month = "11",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1002/clc.20966",
language = "English",
volume = "34",
pages = "706--713",
journal = "Clinical Cardiology",
issn = "0160-9289",
publisher = "John Wiley and Sons Inc.",
number = "11",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Intravascular ultrasound-guided primary percutaneous coronary intervention with drug-eluting stent implantation in patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction

AU - Youn, Youngjin

AU - Yoon, Junghan

AU - Lee, Junwon

AU - Ahn, Sung Gyun

AU - Ahn, Minsoo

AU - Kim, Jang Young

AU - Yoo, Byungsu

AU - Lee, Seunghwan

AU - Choe, Kyung Hoon

PY - 2011/11/1

Y1 - 2011/11/1

N2 - Background: Studies investigating the clinical outcome of intravascular ultrasound (IVUS)-guided primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PPCI) in patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) show conflicting results. The aim of our study was to evaluate whether IVUS-guidedPPCI with drug-eluting stents (DESs) in STEMI patients improves clinical outcome. Hypothesis: IVUS-guided PPCI is superior to angio-guided PPCI. Methods: Three hundred forty-one patients who underwent PPCI for STEMI and survived the hospitalization were enrolled in this study. Two hundred sixteen (63.3%) patients were treated with angio-guided PPCI and 125 (36.7%) patients were treated with IVUS-guided PPCI. The primary endpoint was defined as the composite of death, myocardial infarction, target vessel revascularization, and target lesion revascularization at the 3-year follow-up visit. Results: Male gender, dyslipidemia, and smoking were frequent in the IVUS-guided PPCI group. These patients had a higher rate of radial approach, adjunctive ballooning, thrombectomy, and the use of a glycoprotein IIb/IIIa inhibitor. The number and length of implanted stents were higher in the IVUS-guided PPCI group. The primary end point (18.1% vs 12.8%, P = 0.22) and stent thrombosis (2.8% vs 2.4%, P = 1.00) was not different between the groups. Conclusions: In our observational study, IVUS-guided PPCI with DESs in patients with STEMI did not improve clinical outcome or stent thrombosis.

AB - Background: Studies investigating the clinical outcome of intravascular ultrasound (IVUS)-guided primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PPCI) in patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) show conflicting results. The aim of our study was to evaluate whether IVUS-guidedPPCI with drug-eluting stents (DESs) in STEMI patients improves clinical outcome. Hypothesis: IVUS-guided PPCI is superior to angio-guided PPCI. Methods: Three hundred forty-one patients who underwent PPCI for STEMI and survived the hospitalization were enrolled in this study. Two hundred sixteen (63.3%) patients were treated with angio-guided PPCI and 125 (36.7%) patients were treated with IVUS-guided PPCI. The primary endpoint was defined as the composite of death, myocardial infarction, target vessel revascularization, and target lesion revascularization at the 3-year follow-up visit. Results: Male gender, dyslipidemia, and smoking were frequent in the IVUS-guided PPCI group. These patients had a higher rate of radial approach, adjunctive ballooning, thrombectomy, and the use of a glycoprotein IIb/IIIa inhibitor. The number and length of implanted stents were higher in the IVUS-guided PPCI group. The primary end point (18.1% vs 12.8%, P = 0.22) and stent thrombosis (2.8% vs 2.4%, P = 1.00) was not different between the groups. Conclusions: In our observational study, IVUS-guided PPCI with DESs in patients with STEMI did not improve clinical outcome or stent thrombosis.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=81555199984&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=81555199984&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1002/clc.20966

DO - 10.1002/clc.20966

M3 - Article

VL - 34

SP - 706

EP - 713

JO - Clinical Cardiology

JF - Clinical Cardiology

SN - 0160-9289

IS - 11

ER -