Invasive dental procedures as risk factors for postoperative spinal infection and the effect of antibiotic prophylaxis

Sahyun Sung, Eun Hwa Kim, Ji Won Kwon, Jung Seok Lee, Soo Bin Lee, Seong Hwan Moon, Hwan Mo Lee, Inkyung Jung, Byung Ho Lee

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1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Aim: To identify invasive dental procedures as a risk factor for postoperative spinal infection (PSI) and evaluate the effectiveness of antibiotic prophylaxis. Materials and Methods: We analysed 229,335 patients who underwent spinal surgery with instrumentation from 2010 to 2017, using the nationwide database. The incidence of spinal infection 2 years after surgery was determined. Invasive dental procedures as a risk factor for PSI and the effects of antibiotic prophylaxis during this period were also analysed. Results: A total of 15,346 patients (6.69%) were diagnosed with PSI. It was found that advanced age, male sex, and a high Charlson Comorbidity Index were risk factors for PSI. The risk of PSI did not increase following dental procedures (adjusted hazard ratio [HR] 0.850; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.793–0.912) and was not affected by antibiotics (adjusted HR 1.097; 95% CI, 0.987–1.218). Patients who received dental treatment as early as 3 months after spinal surgery had the lowest risk of postoperative infection (adjusted HR 0.869; 95% CI, 0.795–0.950). Conclusions: Invasive dental procedure does not increase the risk of PSI, and antibiotic prophylaxis before dental procedure was not effective in preventing spinal infection.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1270-1280
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Clinical Periodontology
Volume48
Issue number9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2021 Sep

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2021 The Authors. Journal of Clinical Periodontology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Periodontics

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