Iron-fortified recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae producing Sus scrofa ferritin heavy-chain recovers iron deficiency in mice

Hwan Lim, Jong Taek Kim, Myoung Dong Kim, Ki Jong Rhee, Bae Dong Jung

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

In this study, we produced iron-fortified yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) producing Sus scrofa ferritin heavy-chain to provide iron supplementation in anemic piglets. We determined whether iron-ferritin accumulated in recombinant yeasts could improve iron deficiency in mice. C57BL/6 male mice exposed to Fe-deficient diet for 2 weeks were given a single dose of ferrous ammonium sulfate (FAS), ferritin-producing recombinant yeast (APO), or APO reacted with iron (Fe2+) (FER). The bioavailability of recombinant yeasts was examined by measuring body weight gain, hemoglobin concentration and hematocrit value 1 week later. In addition, ferritin protein levels were evaluated by western blot analysis and iron stores in tissues were measured by inductively coupled plasma spectrometer. We found that anemic mice treated with FER exhibited increased levels of ferritin heavy-chain in spleen and liver. Consistently, this treatment restored the iron concentration in these tissues. In addition, this treatment significantly increased hemoglobin value and the hematocrit ratio. Furthermore, FER treatment significantly enhanced body weight gain. These results suggest that the iron-fortified recombinant yeast strain is bioavailable.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)263-268
Number of pages6
JournalKorean Journal of Veterinary Research
Volume52
Issue number4
Publication statusPublished - 2012

Fingerprint

Apoferritins
Sus scrofa
ferritin
Saccharomyces cerevisiae
Iron
iron
mice
Yeasts
Ferritins
yeasts
Hematocrit
Weight Gain
Hemoglobins
hematocrit
hemoglobin
Body Weight
weight gain
ferrous sulfate
body weight
Biological Availability

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • veterinary(all)

Cite this

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title = "Iron-fortified recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae producing Sus scrofa ferritin heavy-chain recovers iron deficiency in mice",
abstract = "In this study, we produced iron-fortified yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) producing Sus scrofa ferritin heavy-chain to provide iron supplementation in anemic piglets. We determined whether iron-ferritin accumulated in recombinant yeasts could improve iron deficiency in mice. C57BL/6 male mice exposed to Fe-deficient diet for 2 weeks were given a single dose of ferrous ammonium sulfate (FAS), ferritin-producing recombinant yeast (APO), or APO reacted with iron (Fe2+) (FER). The bioavailability of recombinant yeasts was examined by measuring body weight gain, hemoglobin concentration and hematocrit value 1 week later. In addition, ferritin protein levels were evaluated by western blot analysis and iron stores in tissues were measured by inductively coupled plasma spectrometer. We found that anemic mice treated with FER exhibited increased levels of ferritin heavy-chain in spleen and liver. Consistently, this treatment restored the iron concentration in these tissues. In addition, this treatment significantly increased hemoglobin value and the hematocrit ratio. Furthermore, FER treatment significantly enhanced body weight gain. These results suggest that the iron-fortified recombinant yeast strain is bioavailable.",
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Iron-fortified recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae producing Sus scrofa ferritin heavy-chain recovers iron deficiency in mice. / Lim, Hwan; Kim, Jong Taek; Kim, Myoung Dong; Rhee, Ki Jong; Jung, Bae Dong.

In: Korean Journal of Veterinary Research, Vol. 52, No. 4, 2012, p. 263-268.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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