Is one's usual dinner companion associated with greater odds of depression? Using data from the 2014 Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey

Sang Ah Lee, Euncheol Park, Yeong Jun Ju, Jin Young Nam, Tae Hyun Kim

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Support from one's family has been reported to have a positive effect on depression severity. Hence, family dinnertimes, when whole family can gather together, can be effective to depression by providing support from family. Aims: We investigate the association between the dinner companion and depression, and the differences in this association by gender, living arrangement and household composition. Methods: We used the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2014 data. A total of 4,181 individuals were included. We classified participants by their dinner companions as follows: dinner with family, dinner with others and eating alone. Depression was measured by using the 9-item Patient Health Questionnaire. Logistic regression analysis was used to investigate the association. Result: Those who ate dinner alone (odds ratio (OR): 1.53, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.04-2.25) had higher depression rate compared to those who had dinner with family. The subgroup analysis indicated that men, those who live with others and those living in a second-generation household who ate dinner alone had greater odds of having depressive symptoms. Conclusion: Those who usually eat dinner alone have greater odds of developing depression compared to those who have dinner with their family. As such, family dinnertimes may help to alleviate depressive moods.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)560-568
Number of pages9
JournalInternational Journal of Social Psychiatry
Volume62
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016 Sep 1

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Nutrition Surveys
Meals
Depression
Korea
Eating
Logistic Models
Odds Ratio
Regression Analysis
Confidence Intervals

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

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title = "Is one's usual dinner companion associated with greater odds of depression? Using data from the 2014 Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey",
abstract = "Background: Support from one's family has been reported to have a positive effect on depression severity. Hence, family dinnertimes, when whole family can gather together, can be effective to depression by providing support from family. Aims: We investigate the association between the dinner companion and depression, and the differences in this association by gender, living arrangement and household composition. Methods: We used the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2014 data. A total of 4,181 individuals were included. We classified participants by their dinner companions as follows: dinner with family, dinner with others and eating alone. Depression was measured by using the 9-item Patient Health Questionnaire. Logistic regression analysis was used to investigate the association. Result: Those who ate dinner alone (odds ratio (OR): 1.53, 95{\%} confidence interval (CI): 1.04-2.25) had higher depression rate compared to those who had dinner with family. The subgroup analysis indicated that men, those who live with others and those living in a second-generation household who ate dinner alone had greater odds of having depressive symptoms. Conclusion: Those who usually eat dinner alone have greater odds of developing depression compared to those who have dinner with their family. As such, family dinnertimes may help to alleviate depressive moods.",
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Is one's usual dinner companion associated with greater odds of depression? Using data from the 2014 Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. / Lee, Sang Ah; Park, Euncheol; Ju, Yeong Jun; Nam, Jin Young; Kim, Tae Hyun.

In: International Journal of Social Psychiatry, Vol. 62, No. 6, 01.09.2016, p. 560-568.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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N2 - Background: Support from one's family has been reported to have a positive effect on depression severity. Hence, family dinnertimes, when whole family can gather together, can be effective to depression by providing support from family. Aims: We investigate the association between the dinner companion and depression, and the differences in this association by gender, living arrangement and household composition. Methods: We used the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2014 data. A total of 4,181 individuals were included. We classified participants by their dinner companions as follows: dinner with family, dinner with others and eating alone. Depression was measured by using the 9-item Patient Health Questionnaire. Logistic regression analysis was used to investigate the association. Result: Those who ate dinner alone (odds ratio (OR): 1.53, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.04-2.25) had higher depression rate compared to those who had dinner with family. The subgroup analysis indicated that men, those who live with others and those living in a second-generation household who ate dinner alone had greater odds of having depressive symptoms. Conclusion: Those who usually eat dinner alone have greater odds of developing depression compared to those who have dinner with their family. As such, family dinnertimes may help to alleviate depressive moods.

AB - Background: Support from one's family has been reported to have a positive effect on depression severity. Hence, family dinnertimes, when whole family can gather together, can be effective to depression by providing support from family. Aims: We investigate the association between the dinner companion and depression, and the differences in this association by gender, living arrangement and household composition. Methods: We used the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2014 data. A total of 4,181 individuals were included. We classified participants by their dinner companions as follows: dinner with family, dinner with others and eating alone. Depression was measured by using the 9-item Patient Health Questionnaire. Logistic regression analysis was used to investigate the association. Result: Those who ate dinner alone (odds ratio (OR): 1.53, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.04-2.25) had higher depression rate compared to those who had dinner with family. The subgroup analysis indicated that men, those who live with others and those living in a second-generation household who ate dinner alone had greater odds of having depressive symptoms. Conclusion: Those who usually eat dinner alone have greater odds of developing depression compared to those who have dinner with their family. As such, family dinnertimes may help to alleviate depressive moods.

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