Is the role of cultural capital in student achievement in South Korea different? A systematic review

Yeonsoo Choi, Sung won Kim, Won Pyo Hong

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Empirical studies focused on cultural capital only emerged since the 2000s in South Korea. This article is the first to conduct a systematic review aiming to shed light on how the theory of cultural capital has been applied in South Korea. Our main goal is to understand: how the cultural capital–students’ achievement association in South Korea differs from research in western industrialized contexts; and how cultural capital has been defined, and which dimensions have been highlighted as core elements of social reproduction in South Korea. Based on an examination of both quantitative and qualitative studies published since 2000, our analysis suggests that, contrary to the focus on the highbrow culture or classed-based parenting practices in western literature, the institutionalized striving for upward social mobility through education and a popular desire to acquire globally convertible cultural capital is key to unpacking the notion of cultural capital in the South Korean context.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)776-794
Number of pages19
JournalBritish Journal of Sociology of Education
Volume40
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2019 Aug 18

Fingerprint

cultural capital
South Korea
student
Social Mobility
examination
education

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Education
  • Sociology and Political Science

Cite this

@article{040f800e774a4063a5ef0ba6935bcb57,
title = "Is the role of cultural capital in student achievement in South Korea different? A systematic review",
abstract = "Empirical studies focused on cultural capital only emerged since the 2000s in South Korea. This article is the first to conduct a systematic review aiming to shed light on how the theory of cultural capital has been applied in South Korea. Our main goal is to understand: how the cultural capital–students’ achievement association in South Korea differs from research in western industrialized contexts; and how cultural capital has been defined, and which dimensions have been highlighted as core elements of social reproduction in South Korea. Based on an examination of both quantitative and qualitative studies published since 2000, our analysis suggests that, contrary to the focus on the highbrow culture or classed-based parenting practices in western literature, the institutionalized striving for upward social mobility through education and a popular desire to acquire globally convertible cultural capital is key to unpacking the notion of cultural capital in the South Korean context.",
author = "Yeonsoo Choi and Kim, {Sung won} and Hong, {Won Pyo}",
year = "2019",
month = "8",
day = "18",
doi = "10.1080/01425692.2019.1592662",
language = "English",
volume = "40",
pages = "776--794",
journal = "British Journal of Sociology of Education",
issn = "0142-5692",
publisher = "Taylor and Francis Ltd.",
number = "6",

}

Is the role of cultural capital in student achievement in South Korea different? A systematic review. / Choi, Yeonsoo; Kim, Sung won; Hong, Won Pyo.

In: British Journal of Sociology of Education, Vol. 40, No. 6, 18.08.2019, p. 776-794.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Is the role of cultural capital in student achievement in South Korea different? A systematic review

AU - Choi, Yeonsoo

AU - Kim, Sung won

AU - Hong, Won Pyo

PY - 2019/8/18

Y1 - 2019/8/18

N2 - Empirical studies focused on cultural capital only emerged since the 2000s in South Korea. This article is the first to conduct a systematic review aiming to shed light on how the theory of cultural capital has been applied in South Korea. Our main goal is to understand: how the cultural capital–students’ achievement association in South Korea differs from research in western industrialized contexts; and how cultural capital has been defined, and which dimensions have been highlighted as core elements of social reproduction in South Korea. Based on an examination of both quantitative and qualitative studies published since 2000, our analysis suggests that, contrary to the focus on the highbrow culture or classed-based parenting practices in western literature, the institutionalized striving for upward social mobility through education and a popular desire to acquire globally convertible cultural capital is key to unpacking the notion of cultural capital in the South Korean context.

AB - Empirical studies focused on cultural capital only emerged since the 2000s in South Korea. This article is the first to conduct a systematic review aiming to shed light on how the theory of cultural capital has been applied in South Korea. Our main goal is to understand: how the cultural capital–students’ achievement association in South Korea differs from research in western industrialized contexts; and how cultural capital has been defined, and which dimensions have been highlighted as core elements of social reproduction in South Korea. Based on an examination of both quantitative and qualitative studies published since 2000, our analysis suggests that, contrary to the focus on the highbrow culture or classed-based parenting practices in western literature, the institutionalized striving for upward social mobility through education and a popular desire to acquire globally convertible cultural capital is key to unpacking the notion of cultural capital in the South Korean context.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85064240953&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85064240953&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1080/01425692.2019.1592662

DO - 10.1080/01425692.2019.1592662

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:85064240953

VL - 40

SP - 776

EP - 794

JO - British Journal of Sociology of Education

JF - British Journal of Sociology of Education

SN - 0142-5692

IS - 6

ER -