Is there a link between obesity and asthma?

Sang Ha Kim, E. Rand Sutherland, Erwin W. Gelfand

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

58 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Increasing epidemiological data identify a link between obesity and asthma incidence and severity. Based on experimental data, it is possible that shared inflammatory mechanisms play a role in determining this linkage. Although controversial, the role of adipokines may be central to this association and the maintenance of the asthma phenotype. While leptin and adiponectin have a causal link to experimental asthma in mice, data in humans are less conclusive. Recent studies demonstrate that adipokines can regulate the survival and function of eosinophils and that these factors can affect eosinophil trafficking from the bone marrow to the airways. In addition, efferocytosis, the clearance of dead cells, by airway macrophages or blood monocytes appears impaired in obese asthmatics and is inversely correlated with glucocorticoid responsiveness. This review examines the potential mechanisms linking obesity to asthma.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)189-195
Number of pages7
JournalAllergy, Asthma and Immunology Research
Volume6
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014

Fingerprint

Asthma
Obesity
Adipokines
Eosinophils
Adiponectin
Leptin
Glucocorticoids
Monocytes
Bone Marrow
Macrophages
Maintenance
Phenotype
Survival
Incidence

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Immunology
  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine

Cite this

Kim, Sang Ha ; Sutherland, E. Rand ; Gelfand, Erwin W. / Is there a link between obesity and asthma?. In: Allergy, Asthma and Immunology Research. 2014 ; Vol. 6, No. 3. pp. 189-195.
@article{32994de7be8b4fa29c52b78b49d413fa,
title = "Is there a link between obesity and asthma?",
abstract = "Increasing epidemiological data identify a link between obesity and asthma incidence and severity. Based on experimental data, it is possible that shared inflammatory mechanisms play a role in determining this linkage. Although controversial, the role of adipokines may be central to this association and the maintenance of the asthma phenotype. While leptin and adiponectin have a causal link to experimental asthma in mice, data in humans are less conclusive. Recent studies demonstrate that adipokines can regulate the survival and function of eosinophils and that these factors can affect eosinophil trafficking from the bone marrow to the airways. In addition, efferocytosis, the clearance of dead cells, by airway macrophages or blood monocytes appears impaired in obese asthmatics and is inversely correlated with glucocorticoid responsiveness. This review examines the potential mechanisms linking obesity to asthma.",
author = "Kim, {Sang Ha} and Sutherland, {E. Rand} and Gelfand, {Erwin W.}",
year = "2014",
doi = "10.4168/aair.2014.6.3.189",
language = "English",
volume = "6",
pages = "189--195",
journal = "Allergy, Asthma and Immunology Research",
issn = "2092-7355",
publisher = "Korean Academy of Asthma, Allergy and Clinical Immunology",
number = "3",

}

Is there a link between obesity and asthma? / Kim, Sang Ha; Sutherland, E. Rand; Gelfand, Erwin W.

In: Allergy, Asthma and Immunology Research, Vol. 6, No. 3, 2014, p. 189-195.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

TY - JOUR

T1 - Is there a link between obesity and asthma?

AU - Kim, Sang Ha

AU - Sutherland, E. Rand

AU - Gelfand, Erwin W.

PY - 2014

Y1 - 2014

N2 - Increasing epidemiological data identify a link between obesity and asthma incidence and severity. Based on experimental data, it is possible that shared inflammatory mechanisms play a role in determining this linkage. Although controversial, the role of adipokines may be central to this association and the maintenance of the asthma phenotype. While leptin and adiponectin have a causal link to experimental asthma in mice, data in humans are less conclusive. Recent studies demonstrate that adipokines can regulate the survival and function of eosinophils and that these factors can affect eosinophil trafficking from the bone marrow to the airways. In addition, efferocytosis, the clearance of dead cells, by airway macrophages or blood monocytes appears impaired in obese asthmatics and is inversely correlated with glucocorticoid responsiveness. This review examines the potential mechanisms linking obesity to asthma.

AB - Increasing epidemiological data identify a link between obesity and asthma incidence and severity. Based on experimental data, it is possible that shared inflammatory mechanisms play a role in determining this linkage. Although controversial, the role of adipokines may be central to this association and the maintenance of the asthma phenotype. While leptin and adiponectin have a causal link to experimental asthma in mice, data in humans are less conclusive. Recent studies demonstrate that adipokines can regulate the survival and function of eosinophils and that these factors can affect eosinophil trafficking from the bone marrow to the airways. In addition, efferocytosis, the clearance of dead cells, by airway macrophages or blood monocytes appears impaired in obese asthmatics and is inversely correlated with glucocorticoid responsiveness. This review examines the potential mechanisms linking obesity to asthma.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84899628644&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84899628644&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.4168/aair.2014.6.3.189

DO - 10.4168/aair.2014.6.3.189

M3 - Review article

AN - SCOPUS:84899628644

VL - 6

SP - 189

EP - 195

JO - Allergy, Asthma and Immunology Research

JF - Allergy, Asthma and Immunology Research

SN - 2092-7355

IS - 3

ER -