JiffyNet: a web-based instant protein network modeler for newly sequenced species.

Eiru Kim, Hanhae Kim, Insuk Lee

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

23 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Revolutionary DNA sequencing technology has enabled affordable genome sequencing for numerous species. Thousands of species already have completely decoded genomes, and tens of thousands more are in progress. Naturally, parallel expansion of the functional parts list library is anticipated, yet genome-level understanding of function also requires maps of functional relationships, such as functional protein networks. Such networks have been constructed for many sequenced species including common model organisms. Nevertheless, the majority of species with sequenced genomes still have no protein network models available. Moreover, biologists might want to obtain protein networks for their species of interest on completion of the genome projects. Therefore, there is high demand for accessible means to automatically construct genome-scale protein networks based on sequence information from genome projects only. Here, we present a public web server, JiffyNet, specifically designed to instantly construct genome-scale protein networks based on associalogs (functional associations transferred from a template network by orthology) for a query species with only protein sequences provided. Assessment of the networks by JiffyNet demonstrated generally high predictive ability for pathway annotations. Furthermore, JiffyNet provides network visualization and analysis pages for wide variety of molecular concepts to facilitate network-guided hypothesis generation. JiffyNet is freely accessible at http://www.jiffynet.org.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)W192-197
JournalUnknown Journal
Volume41
Issue numberWeb Server issue
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013 Jul

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Genetics

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