Large eddy simulation of particle re-suspension during a footstep

Jung Il Choi, Jack R. Edwards, Jacky A. Rosati, Alfred D. Eisner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Re-suspension of particulate matter under human activity can have a significant impact on particle concentrations in indoor environments. The removal of surface-bound particulates as a person's foot contacts a substrate and the subsequent transport of such particulates through wake entrainment effects and through deposition is an importantmechanism for particle dispersion.To study aspects of this event, we perform high-fidelity simulations of particle transport due to the heel-to-toe contact of a foot with a particle-laden carpet. For this purpose, an immersed boundary method is extended to account for particle transport, re-suspension, and deposition near the surface of the foot. Particle deposition is modeled as a combination of gravitational settling, Brownian diffusion, and convective impaction, while a dynamic re-suspension model is used to model particle re-suspension from the surfaces. We demonstrate the details of transient transport phenomena of re-suspended particles during a heel-to-toe foot motion event. The effects of the thickness of the carpet layer, the foot penetration depth into the carpet layer, the foot speed, and particle sizes on the mass re-suspended are investigated. Parametric studies show that a deeper foot penetration into a thinner carpet layer increases particle re-suspension and a faster foot motion also increases the re-suspension. Re-suspension rates increase as the particle size increases for particles in a size range of 1-20 μm. Predicted re-suspension rates are compared with those obtained in recent experiments.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)767-780
Number of pages14
JournalAerosol Science and Technology
Volume46
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2012 Jul 1

Fingerprint

large eddy simulation
Large eddy simulation
resuspension
Suspensions
Particle size
Substrates
penetration
Particulate Matter
particle size
particle
Experiments
redeposition
entrainment
range size
particulate matter
human activity
substrate

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Environmental Chemistry
  • Materials Science(all)
  • Pollution

Cite this

Choi, Jung Il ; Edwards, Jack R. ; Rosati, Jacky A. ; Eisner, Alfred D. / Large eddy simulation of particle re-suspension during a footstep. In: Aerosol Science and Technology. 2012 ; Vol. 46, No. 7. pp. 767-780.
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Large eddy simulation of particle re-suspension during a footstep. / Choi, Jung Il; Edwards, Jack R.; Rosati, Jacky A.; Eisner, Alfred D.

In: Aerosol Science and Technology, Vol. 46, No. 7, 01.07.2012, p. 767-780.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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