Left-behind children: teachers’ perceptions of family-school relations in rural China

Sung won Kim

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Large-scale rural-urban migration in China has left rural schools with large proportions of left-behind children whose parents are away working in the city. This has a huge impact on family-school relations and poses a burden on teachers. This study draws on 42 interviews with teachers working in two rural schools. This article argues that teachers’ negative narratives about antagonistic family-school relations are driven by the gaps between their culturally embedded traditional models of family-school relations and the reality, with implications for the expanded role of schools and that of grandparents as caregivers. This article further discusses the implications of these findings for rural schools and draws heavily on Western models of family-school relations in a comparative perspective.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)584-601
Number of pages18
JournalCompare
Volume49
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2019 Jul 4

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rural school
China
teacher
school
rural-urban migration
caregiver
parents
narrative
interview

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Education

Cite this

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Left-behind children : teachers’ perceptions of family-school relations in rural China. / Kim, Sung won.

In: Compare, Vol. 49, No. 4, 04.07.2019, p. 584-601.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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