Liquid-phase pulsed laser ablation synthesis of graphitized carbon-encapsulated palladium core-shell nanospheres for catalytic reduction of nitrobenzene to aniline

Yu Jin Kim, Rory Ma, D. Amaranatha Reddy, Tae Kyu Kim

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Graphitized carbon-encapsulated palladium (Pd) core-shell nanospheres were produced via pulsed laser ablation of a solid Pd foil target submerged in acetonitrile. The microstructural features and optical properties of these nanospheres were characterized via high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and UV-visible spectroscopy. Microstructural analysis indicated that the core-shell nanostructures consisted of single-crystalline cubic metallic Pd spheres that serve as the core material, over which graphitized carbon was anchored as a heterogeneous shell. The absorbance spectrum of the synthesized nanostructures exhibited a broad (absorption) band at ∼264 nm; this band corresponded to the typical inter-band transition of a metallic system and resulted possibly from the absorbance of the ionic Pd 2+ . The catalytic properties of the Pd and Pd@C core-shell nanostructures were investigated using the reduction of nitrobenzene to aniline by an excess amount of NaBH 4 in an aqueous solution at room temperature, as a model reaction. Owing to the graphitized carbon-layered structure and the high specific surface area, the resulting Pd@C nanostructures exhibited higher conversion efficiencies than their bare Pd counterparts. In fact, the layered structure provided access to the surface of the Pd nanostructures for the hydrogenation reaction, owing to the synergistic effect between graphitized carbon and the nanostructures. Their unique structure and excellent catalytic performance render Pd@C core-shell nanostructures highly promising candidates for catalysis applications.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2112-2120
Number of pages9
JournalApplied Surface Science
Volume357
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015 Dec 1

Fingerprint

Nitrobenzene
Nanospheres
nitrobenzenes
Palladium
Laser ablation
Aniline
aniline
Pulsed lasers
laser ablation
palladium
pulsed lasers
liquid phases
Carbon
Nanostructures
carbon
Liquids
synthesis
nitrobenzene
High resolution transmission electron microscopy
Acetonitrile

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Surfaces, Coatings and Films

Cite this

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title = "Liquid-phase pulsed laser ablation synthesis of graphitized carbon-encapsulated palladium core-shell nanospheres for catalytic reduction of nitrobenzene to aniline",
abstract = "Graphitized carbon-encapsulated palladium (Pd) core-shell nanospheres were produced via pulsed laser ablation of a solid Pd foil target submerged in acetonitrile. The microstructural features and optical properties of these nanospheres were characterized via high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and UV-visible spectroscopy. Microstructural analysis indicated that the core-shell nanostructures consisted of single-crystalline cubic metallic Pd spheres that serve as the core material, over which graphitized carbon was anchored as a heterogeneous shell. The absorbance spectrum of the synthesized nanostructures exhibited a broad (absorption) band at ∼264 nm; this band corresponded to the typical inter-band transition of a metallic system and resulted possibly from the absorbance of the ionic Pd 2+ . The catalytic properties of the Pd and Pd@C core-shell nanostructures were investigated using the reduction of nitrobenzene to aniline by an excess amount of NaBH 4 in an aqueous solution at room temperature, as a model reaction. Owing to the graphitized carbon-layered structure and the high specific surface area, the resulting Pd@C nanostructures exhibited higher conversion efficiencies than their bare Pd counterparts. In fact, the layered structure provided access to the surface of the Pd nanostructures for the hydrogenation reaction, owing to the synergistic effect between graphitized carbon and the nanostructures. Their unique structure and excellent catalytic performance render Pd@C core-shell nanostructures highly promising candidates for catalysis applications.",
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Liquid-phase pulsed laser ablation synthesis of graphitized carbon-encapsulated palladium core-shell nanospheres for catalytic reduction of nitrobenzene to aniline. / Kim, Yu Jin; Ma, Rory; Reddy, D. Amaranatha; Kim, Tae Kyu.

In: Applied Surface Science, Vol. 357, 01.12.2015, p. 2112-2120.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Kim, Yu Jin

AU - Ma, Rory

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