Local heat/mass transfer and flow characteristics of array impinging jets with effusion holes ejecting spent air

Dong Ho Rhee, Pil Hyun Yoon, Hyung Hee Cho

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

89 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The present study investigates the effects of spent air flows with and without effusion holes on heat/mass transfer on a target plate for array impinging jets. For a conventional type of array impinging jets without effusion holes, the spent air of the injected jets forms a cross-flow within the confined space and affects significantly the downstream jet flow. The injection plate of array impinging jets is modified having effusion holes to prevent the cross-flow of the spent air where the spent air is discharged through the effusion holes after impingement on the target plate. A naphthalene sublimation method is employed to determine local heat/mass transfer coefficients on the target plate using a heat and mass transfer analogy. The flow patterns of the array impinging jets are calculated numerically and compared for the cases without and with the effusion holes. For small gap distances, heat/mass transfer coefficients without effusion holes are very non-uniform due to the strong effects of cross-flow and re-entrainments of spent air. However, uniform distributions and enhancements of heat/mass transfer coefficients are obtained by installing the effusion holes. For large gap distances, the effect of cross-flow is weak and the distributions and levels of heat/mass transfer coefficients are similar for both cases.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1049-1061
Number of pages13
JournalInternational Journal of Heat and Mass Transfer
Volume46
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2003 Mar 1

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Condensed Matter Physics
  • Mechanical Engineering
  • Fluid Flow and Transfer Processes

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