Long-term outcomes after renal denervation in an Asian population: results from the Global SYMPLICITY Registry in South Korea (GSR Korea)

Byeong Keuk Kim, Hyo Soo Kim, Seung Jung Park, Chang Gyu Park, Ki Bae Seung, Hyeon Cheol Gwon, Dong Ju Choi, Tae Hoon Ahn, Chong Jin Kim, Hyuck Moon Kwon, Cheryl Shen, Yangsoo Jang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The objective of this work was to investigate the long-term safety and efficacy of renal denervation in Korean patients from the Global SYMPLICITY Registry (GSR). GSR Korea is a substudy of GSR with additional inclusion and exclusion criteria compared to GSR, including inclusion criteria of office systolic blood pressure ≥160 mmHg, or ≥150 mmHg for type 2 diabetes patients, while receiving 3 or more antihypertensive medications without changes for 2 weeks prior to enrollment. Renal denervation was performed using a Symplicity Flex catheter for ablation in the main renal arteries. Changes in office systolic blood pressure and adverse events were collected for up to 36 months of follow-up for 102 patients in GSR Korea. In addition, adverse events and reductions in office systolic blood pressure were analyzed for patients with and without type II diabetes mellitus. Renal denervation led to mean (± standard deviation) reductions in office systolic blood pressure at 12, 24, and 36 months in GSR Korea (−26.7 ± 18.5, −30.1 ± 21.6 mmHg, and −32.5 ± 18.8, respectively). The proportion of patients with a ≥10 mmHg office systolic blood pressure reduction from baseline was 86.3% at 12 months, 86.5% at 24 months, and 89.7% at 36 months. Adverse events at 3 years were rare. In addition, reductions in office systolic blood pressure were similar for patients with vs. without diabetes mellitus (p > 0.05 at all timepoints). Office systolic blood pressure was safely reduced at up to 36 months post-renal denervation in GSR Korea, and adverse events were rare. In addition, patients with and without diabetes had similar office systolic blood pressure reductions.

Original languageEnglish
JournalHypertension Research
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 2021

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
Global SYMPLICITY Registry was funded by

Publisher Copyright:
© 2021, The Author(s), under exclusive licence to The Japanese Society of Hypertension.

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Internal Medicine
  • Physiology
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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