Long-term outcomes of dental implants placed in elderly patients: a retrospective clinical and radiographic analysis

Jung Chul Park, Won Sun Baek, Seongho Choi, Kyoo Sung Cho, Ui-Won Jung

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: The aim of this retrospective study was to determine the clinical and the radiographic outcomes of dental implants placed in elderly people older than 65 years. Materials and methods: In total, 902 implants in 346 patients (age: 65–89 years) were followed up for 2–17 years following the implant surgery. The survival rate of these implants was recorded and analyzed. Changes in marginal bone levels were also analyzed in serial radiographs, and Cox regression analysis for implant loss was performed. Results: The survival rates were 95.39% and 99.98% in the implant- and patient-based analyses, respectively (involving a total of 29 implant failures), and the marginal bone loss at the implants was 0.17 ± 0.71 mm (mean ± SD). The number of failures was greatest in patients aged 65–69 years. The Cox regression with shared frailty analysis showed that implant loss was significantly greater in those aged 65–69 years than in those aged 70–74 years (P < 0.05), and it varied between specific implant systems. Conclusions: Within the limitations of this retrospective study, it was concluded that implant therapy can be successfully provided to elderly patients and that age alone does not seem to affect the implant survival rate.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)186-191
Number of pages6
JournalClinical Oral Implants Research
Volume28
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017 Feb 1

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Dental Implants
Survival Rate
Retrospective Studies
Bone and Bones
Regression Analysis
Therapeutics

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Oral Surgery

Cite this

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abstract = "Objectives: The aim of this retrospective study was to determine the clinical and the radiographic outcomes of dental implants placed in elderly people older than 65 years. Materials and methods: In total, 902 implants in 346 patients (age: 65–89 years) were followed up for 2–17 years following the implant surgery. The survival rate of these implants was recorded and analyzed. Changes in marginal bone levels were also analyzed in serial radiographs, and Cox regression analysis for implant loss was performed. Results: The survival rates were 95.39{\%} and 99.98{\%} in the implant- and patient-based analyses, respectively (involving a total of 29 implant failures), and the marginal bone loss at the implants was 0.17 ± 0.71 mm (mean ± SD). The number of failures was greatest in patients aged 65–69 years. The Cox regression with shared frailty analysis showed that implant loss was significantly greater in those aged 65–69 years than in those aged 70–74 years (P < 0.05), and it varied between specific implant systems. Conclusions: Within the limitations of this retrospective study, it was concluded that implant therapy can be successfully provided to elderly patients and that age alone does not seem to affect the implant survival rate.",
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Long-term outcomes of dental implants placed in elderly patients : a retrospective clinical and radiographic analysis. / Park, Jung Chul; Baek, Won Sun; Choi, Seongho; Cho, Kyoo Sung; Jung, Ui-Won.

In: Clinical Oral Implants Research, Vol. 28, No. 2, 01.02.2017, p. 186-191.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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