Long-term stability of anterior open-bite treatment by intrusion of maxillary posterior teeth

Man Suk Baek, Yoon Jeong Choi, Hyung Seog Yu, Keejoon Lee, Jinny Kwak, Young Chel Park

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Introduction: Anterior open bite results from the combined influences of skeletal, dental, functional, and habitual factors. The long-term stability of anterior open bite corrected with absolute anchorage has not been thoroughly investigated. The purpose of this study was to examine the long-term stability of anterior open-bite correction with intrusion of the maxillary posterior teeth. Methods: Nine adults with anterior open bite were treated by intrusion of the maxillary posterior teeth. Lateral cephalographs were taken immediately before and after treatment, 1 year posttreatment, and 3 years posttreatment to evaluate the postintrusion stability of the maxillary posterior teeth. Results: On average, the maxillary first molars were intruded by 2.39 mm (P <0.01) during treatment and erupted by 0.45 mm (P <0.05) at the 3-year follow-up, for a relapse rate of 22.88%. Eighty percent of the total relapse of the intruded maxillary first molars occurred during the first year of retention. Incisal overbite increased by a mean of 5.56 mm (P <0.001) during treatment and decreased by a mean of 1.20 mm (P <0.05) by the end of the 3-year follow-up period, for a relapse rate of 17.00%. Incisal overbite significantly relapsed during the first year of retention (P <0.05) but did not exhibit significant recurrence between the 1-year and 3-year follow-ups. Conclusions: Most relapse occurred during the first year of retention. Thus, it is reasonable to conclude that the application of an appropriate retention method during this period clearly enhances the long-term stability of the treatment.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)396.e1-396.e9
JournalAmerican Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics
Volume138
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2010 Jan 1

Fingerprint

Open Bite
Tooth
Recurrence
Overbite

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Orthodontics

Cite this

Baek, Man Suk ; Choi, Yoon Jeong ; Yu, Hyung Seog ; Lee, Keejoon ; Kwak, Jinny ; Park, Young Chel. / Long-term stability of anterior open-bite treatment by intrusion of maxillary posterior teeth. In: American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics. 2010 ; Vol. 138, No. 4. pp. 396.e1-396.e9.
@article{acc3f11b4b2c4b2a97afd7c0d7658794,
title = "Long-term stability of anterior open-bite treatment by intrusion of maxillary posterior teeth",
abstract = "Introduction: Anterior open bite results from the combined influences of skeletal, dental, functional, and habitual factors. The long-term stability of anterior open bite corrected with absolute anchorage has not been thoroughly investigated. The purpose of this study was to examine the long-term stability of anterior open-bite correction with intrusion of the maxillary posterior teeth. Methods: Nine adults with anterior open bite were treated by intrusion of the maxillary posterior teeth. Lateral cephalographs were taken immediately before and after treatment, 1 year posttreatment, and 3 years posttreatment to evaluate the postintrusion stability of the maxillary posterior teeth. Results: On average, the maxillary first molars were intruded by 2.39 mm (P <0.01) during treatment and erupted by 0.45 mm (P <0.05) at the 3-year follow-up, for a relapse rate of 22.88{\%}. Eighty percent of the total relapse of the intruded maxillary first molars occurred during the first year of retention. Incisal overbite increased by a mean of 5.56 mm (P <0.001) during treatment and decreased by a mean of 1.20 mm (P <0.05) by the end of the 3-year follow-up period, for a relapse rate of 17.00{\%}. Incisal overbite significantly relapsed during the first year of retention (P <0.05) but did not exhibit significant recurrence between the 1-year and 3-year follow-ups. Conclusions: Most relapse occurred during the first year of retention. Thus, it is reasonable to conclude that the application of an appropriate retention method during this period clearly enhances the long-term stability of the treatment.",
author = "Baek, {Man Suk} and Choi, {Yoon Jeong} and Yu, {Hyung Seog} and Keejoon Lee and Jinny Kwak and Park, {Young Chel}",
year = "2010",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.ajodo.2010.04.023",
language = "English",
volume = "138",
pages = "396.e1--396.e9",
journal = "American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics",
issn = "0889-5406",
publisher = "Mosby Inc.",
number = "4",

}

Long-term stability of anterior open-bite treatment by intrusion of maxillary posterior teeth. / Baek, Man Suk; Choi, Yoon Jeong; Yu, Hyung Seog; Lee, Keejoon; Kwak, Jinny; Park, Young Chel.

In: American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Vol. 138, No. 4, 01.01.2010, p. 396.e1-396.e9.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Long-term stability of anterior open-bite treatment by intrusion of maxillary posterior teeth

AU - Baek, Man Suk

AU - Choi, Yoon Jeong

AU - Yu, Hyung Seog

AU - Lee, Keejoon

AU - Kwak, Jinny

AU - Park, Young Chel

PY - 2010/1/1

Y1 - 2010/1/1

N2 - Introduction: Anterior open bite results from the combined influences of skeletal, dental, functional, and habitual factors. The long-term stability of anterior open bite corrected with absolute anchorage has not been thoroughly investigated. The purpose of this study was to examine the long-term stability of anterior open-bite correction with intrusion of the maxillary posterior teeth. Methods: Nine adults with anterior open bite were treated by intrusion of the maxillary posterior teeth. Lateral cephalographs were taken immediately before and after treatment, 1 year posttreatment, and 3 years posttreatment to evaluate the postintrusion stability of the maxillary posterior teeth. Results: On average, the maxillary first molars were intruded by 2.39 mm (P <0.01) during treatment and erupted by 0.45 mm (P <0.05) at the 3-year follow-up, for a relapse rate of 22.88%. Eighty percent of the total relapse of the intruded maxillary first molars occurred during the first year of retention. Incisal overbite increased by a mean of 5.56 mm (P <0.001) during treatment and decreased by a mean of 1.20 mm (P <0.05) by the end of the 3-year follow-up period, for a relapse rate of 17.00%. Incisal overbite significantly relapsed during the first year of retention (P <0.05) but did not exhibit significant recurrence between the 1-year and 3-year follow-ups. Conclusions: Most relapse occurred during the first year of retention. Thus, it is reasonable to conclude that the application of an appropriate retention method during this period clearly enhances the long-term stability of the treatment.

AB - Introduction: Anterior open bite results from the combined influences of skeletal, dental, functional, and habitual factors. The long-term stability of anterior open bite corrected with absolute anchorage has not been thoroughly investigated. The purpose of this study was to examine the long-term stability of anterior open-bite correction with intrusion of the maxillary posterior teeth. Methods: Nine adults with anterior open bite were treated by intrusion of the maxillary posterior teeth. Lateral cephalographs were taken immediately before and after treatment, 1 year posttreatment, and 3 years posttreatment to evaluate the postintrusion stability of the maxillary posterior teeth. Results: On average, the maxillary first molars were intruded by 2.39 mm (P <0.01) during treatment and erupted by 0.45 mm (P <0.05) at the 3-year follow-up, for a relapse rate of 22.88%. Eighty percent of the total relapse of the intruded maxillary first molars occurred during the first year of retention. Incisal overbite increased by a mean of 5.56 mm (P <0.001) during treatment and decreased by a mean of 1.20 mm (P <0.05) by the end of the 3-year follow-up period, for a relapse rate of 17.00%. Incisal overbite significantly relapsed during the first year of retention (P <0.05) but did not exhibit significant recurrence between the 1-year and 3-year follow-ups. Conclusions: Most relapse occurred during the first year of retention. Thus, it is reasonable to conclude that the application of an appropriate retention method during this period clearly enhances the long-term stability of the treatment.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85058720789&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85058720789&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.ajodo.2010.04.023

DO - 10.1016/j.ajodo.2010.04.023

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:85058720789

VL - 138

SP - 396.e1-396.e9

JO - American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics

JF - American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics

SN - 0889-5406

IS - 4

ER -