Low Melting Temperature of Anhydrous Mantle Materials at the Core-Mantle Boundary

Taehyun Kim, Byeongkwan Ko, Eran Greenberg, Vitali Prakapenka, Sang Heon Shim, Yongjae Lee

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3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

One of the central challenges in accurately estimating the mantle melting temperature is the sensitivity of the probe for detecting a small amount of melt at the solidus. To address this, we used a multichannel collimator to enhance the diffuse X-ray scattering from a small amount of melt and probed an eutectic pyrolitic composition to increase the amount of melt at the solidus. Our in situ detection of diffuse scattering from the pyrolitic melt determined an anhydrous melting temperature of 3,302 ± 100 K at 119 ± 6 GPa and 3,430 ± 130 K at the core-mantle boundary (CMB) conditions, as the upper bound temperature. Our CMB temperature is approximately 700 K lower than the previous estimates, implying much faster secular cooling and higher concentrations of S, C, O, and/or H in the region, and nonlinear, advocating the basal magma ocean hypothesis.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere2020GL089345
JournalGeophysical Research Letters
Volume47
Issue number20
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2020 Oct 28

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
This work was supported by the Leader Researcher program (NRF-2018R1A3B1052042) of the Korean Ministry of Science and ICT (MSIT). We also thank the supports by NRF-2016K1A4A3914691 and NRF-2016K1A3A7A09005244 grants of the MSIT and PM18030 (20140409) funded by the Ministry of Ocean and Fisheries, Korea. Sang-Heon Shim and Byeongkwan Ko were supported by the National Science Foundation, USA (EAR-1725094). Synchrotron experiments were performed at GeoSoilEnviroCARS (The University of Chicago, Sector 13), Advanced Photon Source (APS), Argonne National Laboratory. GeoSoilEnviroCARS is supported by the National Science Foundation - Earth Sciences (EAR-1634415) and Department of Energy?GeoSciences (DE-FG02-94ER14466). Part of this research used resources of the Advanced Photon Source, a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science User Facility operated for the DOE Office of Science by Argonne National Laboratory under Contract No. DE-AC02-06CH11357. We also acknowledge the use of facilities at the Eyring Materials Center at Arizona State University.

Funding Information:
This work was supported by the Leader Researcher program (NRF‐2018R1A3B1052042) of the Korean Ministry of Science and ICT (MSIT). We also thank the supports by NRF‐2016K1A4A3914691 and NRF‐2016K1A3A7A09005244 grants of the MSIT and PM18030 (20140409) funded by the Ministry of Ocean and Fisheries, Korea. Sang‐Heon Shim and Byeongkwan Ko were supported by the National Science Foundation, USA (EAR‐1725094). Synchrotron experiments were performed at GeoSoilEnviroCARS (The University of Chicago, Sector 13), Advanced Photon Source (APS), Argonne National Laboratory. GeoSoilEnviroCARS is supported by the National Science Foundation ‐ Earth Sciences (EAR‐1634415) and Department of Energy—GeoSciences (DE‐FG02‐94ER14466). Part of this research used resources of the Advanced Photon Source, a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science User Facility operated for the DOE Office of Science by Argonne National Laboratory under Contract No. DE‐AC02‐06CH11357. We also acknowledge the use of facilities at the Eyring Materials Center at Arizona State University.

Publisher Copyright:
©2020. American Geophysical Union. All Rights Reserved.

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Geophysics
  • Earth and Planetary Sciences(all)

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