Lower relative handgrip strength is significantly associated with a higher prevalence of the metabolic syndrome in adults

Ji Yong Byeon, Mi Kyung Lee, Mi Seong Yu, Min Jae Kang, Dong Hoon Lee, Kyong Chol Kim, Jee Aee Im, Sun Hyun Kim, Justin Y. Jeon

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: In previous studies, there were debates on the association between handgrip strength (HGS) and prevalence of metabolic syndrome. Since body weight is associated with both HGS and prevalence of metabolic syndrome, whether HGS is corrected with body weight (relative HGS) or not (absolute HGS) can directly influence outcome of the study. Therefore, this study analyzed the relationship between HGS and prevalence of metabolic syndrome using both relative and absolute HGS. Methods: A total of 1009 Korean adults (488 men and 521 women) were analyzed. Participants were categorized into three groups according to HGS levels. Logistic regression analysis was used to calculate odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) of metabolic syndrome associated with both relative and absolute HGS. Results: Lower absolute HGS was associated with lower prevalence of having abnormal blood pressure (OR: 0.60, 95% CI: 0.37-0.97) and glucose levels (OR: 0.54, 95% CI: 0.34-0.88) in men. However, no association was found between absolute HGS and prevalence of metabolic syndrome. However, a significant inverse association was found between relative HGS and prevalence of metabolic syndrome. Compared with participants in the highest tertile, those in the lowest tertile of relative HGS had 2.52 times (95% CI: 1.43-4.46) and 5.01 times (95% CI: 1.66-15.08) higher prevalence of metabolic syndrome in men and women, respectively. Conclusion: Lower relative HGS but not absolute HGS was associated with higher prevalence of metabolic syndrome. Our study showed that there are evident discrepancies in the association between HGS and prevalence of metabolic syndrome whether HGS is corrected by body weight or not.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)280-288
Number of pages9
JournalMetabolic syndrome and related disorders
Volume17
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2019 Jun

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Confidence Intervals
Odds Ratio
Body Weight
Logistic Models
Regression Analysis
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Blood Pressure
Glucose

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Internal Medicine
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism

Cite this

Byeon, Ji Yong ; Lee, Mi Kyung ; Yu, Mi Seong ; Kang, Min Jae ; Lee, Dong Hoon ; Kim, Kyong Chol ; Im, Jee Aee ; Kim, Sun Hyun ; Jeon, Justin Y. / Lower relative handgrip strength is significantly associated with a higher prevalence of the metabolic syndrome in adults. In: Metabolic syndrome and related disorders. 2019 ; Vol. 17, No. 5. pp. 280-288.
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title = "Lower relative handgrip strength is significantly associated with a higher prevalence of the metabolic syndrome in adults",
abstract = "Purpose: In previous studies, there were debates on the association between handgrip strength (HGS) and prevalence of metabolic syndrome. Since body weight is associated with both HGS and prevalence of metabolic syndrome, whether HGS is corrected with body weight (relative HGS) or not (absolute HGS) can directly influence outcome of the study. Therefore, this study analyzed the relationship between HGS and prevalence of metabolic syndrome using both relative and absolute HGS. Methods: A total of 1009 Korean adults (488 men and 521 women) were analyzed. Participants were categorized into three groups according to HGS levels. Logistic regression analysis was used to calculate odds ratio (OR) and 95{\%} confidence interval (CI) of metabolic syndrome associated with both relative and absolute HGS. Results: Lower absolute HGS was associated with lower prevalence of having abnormal blood pressure (OR: 0.60, 95{\%} CI: 0.37-0.97) and glucose levels (OR: 0.54, 95{\%} CI: 0.34-0.88) in men. However, no association was found between absolute HGS and prevalence of metabolic syndrome. However, a significant inverse association was found between relative HGS and prevalence of metabolic syndrome. Compared with participants in the highest tertile, those in the lowest tertile of relative HGS had 2.52 times (95{\%} CI: 1.43-4.46) and 5.01 times (95{\%} CI: 1.66-15.08) higher prevalence of metabolic syndrome in men and women, respectively. Conclusion: Lower relative HGS but not absolute HGS was associated with higher prevalence of metabolic syndrome. Our study showed that there are evident discrepancies in the association between HGS and prevalence of metabolic syndrome whether HGS is corrected by body weight or not.",
author = "Byeon, {Ji Yong} and Lee, {Mi Kyung} and Yu, {Mi Seong} and Kang, {Min Jae} and Lee, {Dong Hoon} and Kim, {Kyong Chol} and Im, {Jee Aee} and Kim, {Sun Hyun} and Jeon, {Justin Y.}",
year = "2019",
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Lower relative handgrip strength is significantly associated with a higher prevalence of the metabolic syndrome in adults. / Byeon, Ji Yong; Lee, Mi Kyung; Yu, Mi Seong; Kang, Min Jae; Lee, Dong Hoon; Kim, Kyong Chol; Im, Jee Aee; Kim, Sun Hyun; Jeon, Justin Y.

In: Metabolic syndrome and related disorders, Vol. 17, No. 5, 06.2019, p. 280-288.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

TY - JOUR

T1 - Lower relative handgrip strength is significantly associated with a higher prevalence of the metabolic syndrome in adults

AU - Byeon, Ji Yong

AU - Lee, Mi Kyung

AU - Yu, Mi Seong

AU - Kang, Min Jae

AU - Lee, Dong Hoon

AU - Kim, Kyong Chol

AU - Im, Jee Aee

AU - Kim, Sun Hyun

AU - Jeon, Justin Y.

PY - 2019/6

Y1 - 2019/6

N2 - Purpose: In previous studies, there were debates on the association between handgrip strength (HGS) and prevalence of metabolic syndrome. Since body weight is associated with both HGS and prevalence of metabolic syndrome, whether HGS is corrected with body weight (relative HGS) or not (absolute HGS) can directly influence outcome of the study. Therefore, this study analyzed the relationship between HGS and prevalence of metabolic syndrome using both relative and absolute HGS. Methods: A total of 1009 Korean adults (488 men and 521 women) were analyzed. Participants were categorized into three groups according to HGS levels. Logistic regression analysis was used to calculate odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) of metabolic syndrome associated with both relative and absolute HGS. Results: Lower absolute HGS was associated with lower prevalence of having abnormal blood pressure (OR: 0.60, 95% CI: 0.37-0.97) and glucose levels (OR: 0.54, 95% CI: 0.34-0.88) in men. However, no association was found between absolute HGS and prevalence of metabolic syndrome. However, a significant inverse association was found between relative HGS and prevalence of metabolic syndrome. Compared with participants in the highest tertile, those in the lowest tertile of relative HGS had 2.52 times (95% CI: 1.43-4.46) and 5.01 times (95% CI: 1.66-15.08) higher prevalence of metabolic syndrome in men and women, respectively. Conclusion: Lower relative HGS but not absolute HGS was associated with higher prevalence of metabolic syndrome. Our study showed that there are evident discrepancies in the association between HGS and prevalence of metabolic syndrome whether HGS is corrected by body weight or not.

AB - Purpose: In previous studies, there were debates on the association between handgrip strength (HGS) and prevalence of metabolic syndrome. Since body weight is associated with both HGS and prevalence of metabolic syndrome, whether HGS is corrected with body weight (relative HGS) or not (absolute HGS) can directly influence outcome of the study. Therefore, this study analyzed the relationship between HGS and prevalence of metabolic syndrome using both relative and absolute HGS. Methods: A total of 1009 Korean adults (488 men and 521 women) were analyzed. Participants were categorized into three groups according to HGS levels. Logistic regression analysis was used to calculate odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) of metabolic syndrome associated with both relative and absolute HGS. Results: Lower absolute HGS was associated with lower prevalence of having abnormal blood pressure (OR: 0.60, 95% CI: 0.37-0.97) and glucose levels (OR: 0.54, 95% CI: 0.34-0.88) in men. However, no association was found between absolute HGS and prevalence of metabolic syndrome. However, a significant inverse association was found between relative HGS and prevalence of metabolic syndrome. Compared with participants in the highest tertile, those in the lowest tertile of relative HGS had 2.52 times (95% CI: 1.43-4.46) and 5.01 times (95% CI: 1.66-15.08) higher prevalence of metabolic syndrome in men and women, respectively. Conclusion: Lower relative HGS but not absolute HGS was associated with higher prevalence of metabolic syndrome. Our study showed that there are evident discrepancies in the association between HGS and prevalence of metabolic syndrome whether HGS is corrected by body weight or not.

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U2 - 10.1089/met.2018.0111

DO - 10.1089/met.2018.0111

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VL - 17

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JO - Metabolic Syndrome and Related Disorders

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