Managing legitimacy through corporate community involvement: The effects of subsidiary ownership and host country experience in China

Youjin Baik, Young Ryeol Park

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This article examines the legitimacy rationale behind the corporate community involvement of foreign subsidiaries in China from an institutional perspective. Based on the assumption that the level of community involvement reflects a firm’s desire to seek legitimacy in the host country, we suggest two research questions: 1) How do factors determining the need for legitimacy affect foreign subsidiaries’ community involvement? and 2) How can these relationships be moderated by perceived trust in local business relationships? We hypothesize that a foreign parent’s ownership share has a positive effect on its subsidiaries’ local community involvement, while sufficient host country experience leads to less community involvement. We also propose that the level of perceived trust toward local business partners moderates these impacts of parent firm ownership and host country experience on local community involvement. These hypotheses are generally supported by our analysis of 223 Korean subsidiaries in China.

Original languageEnglish
JournalAsia Pacific Journal of Management
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2019 Jan 1

Fingerprint

Host country
Ownership
Subsidiaries
China
Legitimacy
Community involvement
Local communities
Foreign subsidiaries
Institutional perspective
Rationale
Firm ownership
Factors
Share ownership
Business relationships

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Business and International Management
  • Economics, Econometrics and Finance (miscellaneous)
  • Strategy and Management

Cite this

@article{4ac8c3078a3640f59642c82a93b0be9b,
title = "Managing legitimacy through corporate community involvement: The effects of subsidiary ownership and host country experience in China",
abstract = "This article examines the legitimacy rationale behind the corporate community involvement of foreign subsidiaries in China from an institutional perspective. Based on the assumption that the level of community involvement reflects a firm’s desire to seek legitimacy in the host country, we suggest two research questions: 1) How do factors determining the need for legitimacy affect foreign subsidiaries’ community involvement? and 2) How can these relationships be moderated by perceived trust in local business relationships? We hypothesize that a foreign parent’s ownership share has a positive effect on its subsidiaries’ local community involvement, while sufficient host country experience leads to less community involvement. We also propose that the level of perceived trust toward local business partners moderates these impacts of parent firm ownership and host country experience on local community involvement. These hypotheses are generally supported by our analysis of 223 Korean subsidiaries in China.",
author = "Youjin Baik and Park, {Young Ryeol}",
year = "2019",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1007/s10490-019-09670-4",
language = "English",
journal = "Asia Pacific Journal of Management",
issn = "0217-4561",
publisher = "Springer New York",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Managing legitimacy through corporate community involvement

T2 - The effects of subsidiary ownership and host country experience in China

AU - Baik, Youjin

AU - Park, Young Ryeol

PY - 2019/1/1

Y1 - 2019/1/1

N2 - This article examines the legitimacy rationale behind the corporate community involvement of foreign subsidiaries in China from an institutional perspective. Based on the assumption that the level of community involvement reflects a firm’s desire to seek legitimacy in the host country, we suggest two research questions: 1) How do factors determining the need for legitimacy affect foreign subsidiaries’ community involvement? and 2) How can these relationships be moderated by perceived trust in local business relationships? We hypothesize that a foreign parent’s ownership share has a positive effect on its subsidiaries’ local community involvement, while sufficient host country experience leads to less community involvement. We also propose that the level of perceived trust toward local business partners moderates these impacts of parent firm ownership and host country experience on local community involvement. These hypotheses are generally supported by our analysis of 223 Korean subsidiaries in China.

AB - This article examines the legitimacy rationale behind the corporate community involvement of foreign subsidiaries in China from an institutional perspective. Based on the assumption that the level of community involvement reflects a firm’s desire to seek legitimacy in the host country, we suggest two research questions: 1) How do factors determining the need for legitimacy affect foreign subsidiaries’ community involvement? and 2) How can these relationships be moderated by perceived trust in local business relationships? We hypothesize that a foreign parent’s ownership share has a positive effect on its subsidiaries’ local community involvement, while sufficient host country experience leads to less community involvement. We also propose that the level of perceived trust toward local business partners moderates these impacts of parent firm ownership and host country experience on local community involvement. These hypotheses are generally supported by our analysis of 223 Korean subsidiaries in China.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85068226518&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85068226518&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1007/s10490-019-09670-4

DO - 10.1007/s10490-019-09670-4

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:85068226518

JO - Asia Pacific Journal of Management

JF - Asia Pacific Journal of Management

SN - 0217-4561

ER -