MAPK mediates Hsp25 signaling in incisor development

Min Jung Lee, Jinglei Cai, Sung Wook Kwak, Sung Won Cho, Hidemitsu Harada, Han Sung Jung

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Rodent incisors are continuously growing teeth that include all stages of amelogenesis. Understanding amelogenesis requires investigations of the genes and their gene products control the ameloblast phenotype. One of the mechanisms related to tooth differentiation is mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling. The extracellular-signal regulated kinase (ERK)/mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK) cascade is associated with mechanisms that control the cell cycle and cell survival. However, the roles of cascades in incisor development remain to be determined. In this study, we investigated incisor development and growth in the mouse based on MAPK signaling. Moreover, heat-shock protein (Hsp)-25 is well known to be a useful marker of odontoblast differentiation. We used anisomycin (a protein-synthesis inhibitor that activates MAPKs) and U0126 (a MAPK inhibitor that blocks ERK1/2 phosphorylation) to examine the role of MAPKs in Hsp25 signaling in the development of the mouse incisor. We performed immunohistochemistry and in vitro culture using incisor tooth germ, and found that phospho-ERK (pERK), pMEK, and Hsp25 localized in developing incisor ameloblasts and anisomycin failed to produce incisor development. In addition, Western blotting results showed that anisomycin stimulated the phosphorylation of ERK, MEK, and Hsp25, and that some of these proteins were blocked by the U0126. These findings suggest that MAPK signals play important roles in incisor formation, differentiation, and development by mediating Hsp25 signaling.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)593-603
Number of pages11
JournalHistochemistry and cell biology
Volume131
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2009 May 1

Fingerprint

Incisor
Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases
Anisomycin
Extracellular Signal-Regulated MAP Kinases
Amelogenesis
Ameloblasts
Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Kinases
Tooth
Phosphorylation
Tooth Germ
Odontoblasts
MAP Kinase Kinase Kinases
Protein Synthesis Inhibitors
Differentiation Antigens
Protein Kinase Inhibitors
Heat-Shock Proteins
Cell Cycle Checkpoints
Growth and Development
Genes
Rodentia

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Histology
  • Molecular Biology
  • Medical Laboratory Technology
  • Cell Biology

Cite this

Lee, Min Jung ; Cai, Jinglei ; Kwak, Sung Wook ; Cho, Sung Won ; Harada, Hidemitsu ; Jung, Han Sung. / MAPK mediates Hsp25 signaling in incisor development. In: Histochemistry and cell biology. 2009 ; Vol. 131, No. 5. pp. 593-603.
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MAPK mediates Hsp25 signaling in incisor development. / Lee, Min Jung; Cai, Jinglei; Kwak, Sung Wook; Cho, Sung Won; Harada, Hidemitsu; Jung, Han Sung.

In: Histochemistry and cell biology, Vol. 131, No. 5, 01.05.2009, p. 593-603.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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