Mapping three-dimensional surface deformation by combining multiple-aperture interferometry and conventional interferometry

Application to the June 2007 eruption of kilauea volcano, Hawaii

H. S. Jung, Z. Lu, Joong-sun Won, M. P. Poland, A. Miklius

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

95 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Surface deformation caused by an intrusion and small eruption during June 1719, 2007, along the East Rift Zone of Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii, was three-dimensionally reconstructed from radar interferograms acquired by the Advanced Land Observing Satellite (ALOS) phased-array type L-band synthetic aperture radar (SAR) (PALSAR) instrument. To retrieve the 3-D surface deformation, a method that combines multiple-aperture interferometry (MAI) and conventional interferometric SAR (InSAR) techniques was applied to one ascending and one descending ALOS PALSAR interferometric pair. The maximum displacements as a result of the intrusion and eruption are about 0.8, 2, and 0.7 m in the east, north, and up components, respectively. The radar-measured 3-D surface deformation agrees with GPS data from 24 sites on the volcano, and the root-mean-square errors in the east, north, and up components of the displacement are 1.6, 3.6, and 2.1 cm, respectively. Since a horizontal deformation of more than 1 m was dominantly in the north-northwestsouth- southeast direction, a significant improvement of the northsouth component measurement was achieved by the inclusion of MAI measurements that can reach a standard deviation of 3.6 cm. A 3-D deformation reconstruction through the combination of conventional InSAR and MAI will allow for better modeling, and hence, a more comprehensive understanding, of the source geometry associated with volcanic, seismic, and other processes that are manifested by surface deformation.

Original languageEnglish
Article number5503996
Pages (from-to)34-38
Number of pages5
JournalIEEE Geoscience and Remote Sensing Letters
Volume8
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2011 Jan 1

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Volcanoes
interferometry
Interferometry
volcano
volcanic eruption
Synthetic aperture radar
PALSAR
synthetic aperture radar
Radar
radar
Satellites
ALOS
rift zone
Mean square error
Global positioning system
GPS
geometry
Geometry
modeling

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Geotechnical Engineering and Engineering Geology
  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering

Cite this

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abstract = "Surface deformation caused by an intrusion and small eruption during June 1719, 2007, along the East Rift Zone of Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii, was three-dimensionally reconstructed from radar interferograms acquired by the Advanced Land Observing Satellite (ALOS) phased-array type L-band synthetic aperture radar (SAR) (PALSAR) instrument. To retrieve the 3-D surface deformation, a method that combines multiple-aperture interferometry (MAI) and conventional interferometric SAR (InSAR) techniques was applied to one ascending and one descending ALOS PALSAR interferometric pair. The maximum displacements as a result of the intrusion and eruption are about 0.8, 2, and 0.7 m in the east, north, and up components, respectively. The radar-measured 3-D surface deformation agrees with GPS data from 24 sites on the volcano, and the root-mean-square errors in the east, north, and up components of the displacement are 1.6, 3.6, and 2.1 cm, respectively. Since a horizontal deformation of more than 1 m was dominantly in the north-northwestsouth- southeast direction, a significant improvement of the northsouth component measurement was achieved by the inclusion of MAI measurements that can reach a standard deviation of 3.6 cm. A 3-D deformation reconstruction through the combination of conventional InSAR and MAI will allow for better modeling, and hence, a more comprehensive understanding, of the source geometry associated with volcanic, seismic, and other processes that are manifested by surface deformation.",
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